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Gini Dietrich

The Chrysler Tweet: The Take from An Agency Owner

By: Gini Dietrich | March 14, 2011 | 
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When I was 23, I was a freshly promoted account executive. I had just led a very successful campaign for potato farmers across the country. We created Franklin planners for them so they would not only be organized, but have all of the information they needed for controlling weeds, insects, and fungus in their fields. It was for BASF and it was so far out of my wheelhouse (other than I ate potatoes), it wasn’t easy to pretend I knew what I was doing.

But that campaign deemed my promotion and began my “from the farm to the fork” career. I was added to the Bayer Agriculture account to work on horticulture, having oh so much experience through my potato farmer work.

This was when websites were first coming to fruition so you had to include an address, a toll-free number, and a URL to all printed materials. It was my job to work with a trade magazine to write, design, proof, and print an advertorial. It was a big job – it was costing the client $60,000 for this one little piece.

I worked really hard on the advertorial – I wanted my bosses and the client to know that I deserved that promotion I’d just gotten.

And then the advertorial came out. It was gorgeous! I can still picture it. Heck! It’s probably still in a box somewhere in an old portfolio. I was really proud of myself and I knew I had earned that promotion.

And then my boss walked into my office and said, “Did you call the number on the back of this piece?”

My heart sank. I had not called it. It was a wrong number – I had two of the numbers transposed.

Frantically, I called the magazine (who hadn’t called the number either) and they said they only thing they could do was reprint which, thankfully, was in time before it ran in the publication. But, because they should have caught it too, they were willing to split the cost of reprinting with me.

It was going to be $30,000 to reprint.

I was certain I was going to be fired. Then I was certain they were going to dock my pay to pay for it.

I’ll never forget that feeling of being in my boss’s office, with the client on the phone, telling them both what the solution was. We all agreed it needed to be done and that the client wouldn’t be dinged for it. The conference call ended and I meekly said, “So what do you want me to do?”

She said, and I’ll never forget this, “You’ve done exactly what you should have done. We’ll eat this cost and I can guarantee you’ll never make this mistake again.”

She was right. I never have.

Owning An Agency

My 24-year-old, AE self is what I think about when clients get mad at someone on my team and ask for them to be removed from their account. It doesn’t happen often, but it has happened a few times. Clients have relationships with agencies and, sometimes, the person or people on the account, no matter how much or how little experience they have, just don’t jive.

I’ve fired only one person because a client asked her off an account. But I did it because he was the third client to ask her off an account and I realized it wasn’t the clients, it was her.

Sure, we all make mistakes and sometimes the relationship doesn’t work, but I’ve never had a client tell me we had to fire someone in order to keep the account. If we did have a client who demanded that, we’d resign the account. I tend to get overly protective of my team even if, sometimes, they deserve what the client is asking.

But I also believe a client doesn’t run my agency. I do.

Enter Chrysler

This is what I thought about when I read about the fateful F bomb tweet from a New Media Strategies employee on behalf of Chrysler last week.

When I heard the NMS employee was fired, my first reaction was, “Oh no! A client doesn’t get to determine whether or not an agency fires an employee.”

Plus, it definitely seems like  a mistake. How many of you have accidentally tweeted from two accounts? I don’t  personally manage more than my own account, but I know it happens. Heck! I’ve seen it happen. It’s a mistake. Should the person be using the F word in a tweet, no matter which account? No. Was it a mistake? Yes.

Then, as I began to dig into it some more, it began to look as though Chrysler didn’t demand it (maybe more suggested it) and NMS took the initiative on their own. Likely because they were afraid of being fired.

But then Chrysler came out and said they didn’t ask that the employee be fired, but they had made the decision to fire the agency.

My Take

More and more information is coming out about this. And we may never know the full story. We don’t know if the employee was on thin ice. Maybe the agency was on thin ice. Or perhaps Chrysler just overreacted.

The bigger issue, though, is that the agency is tweeting for Chrysler. Why aren’t they managing that one piece of their social media in-house?

They seem to have not missed a beat in their Twitter stream (even tweeting from SXSW this past weekend) so maybe they learned their lesson. And I’d be willing to bet that employee never makes that same mistake again. It’s too bad he/she had to learn the lesson by being fired.

About Gini Dietrich


Gini Dietrich is the founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich, an integrated marketing communications firm. She is the author of Spin Sucks, co-author of Marketing in the Round, and co-host of Inside PR. She also is the lead blogger at Spin Sucks and is the founder of Spin Sucks Pro.

124 comments
meganbeausang
meganbeausang

I have been thinking about this ever since you posted this Gini. On one hand, my thought is, what an idiot - just don't swear on the internet. Of course, my preferred method of communicating is ripe with expletives and I do suffer from road rage, so I can understand where he is coming from. But on a much deeper level - I think this perpetuates a growing dilemma in the American Workplace - that Corporations are priority one and individuals come in a distant second. From tax structure to legislation to the very treatment of people and customers...Corporate America is allowed to do/act unfairly, without passion, without integrity and without consequence. This agency fired its employee within hours of his tweet. No thought, no compassion, it did not defend him and move on. It does not care that they have thrown him out into an impossible job market. A job market that is made worse in Detroit by THEIR CLIENT! What is really troubling is this client made MANY MANY HUGE mistakes and was 'forgiven' by the taxpayer by the tune of $7B. When does the taxpayer (or employee) get an ounce of forgiveness? Thy hypocrisy of this situation is just baffling.

Keena Lykins
Keena Lykins

I've been chatting with people about this over the past few days (surprised at how many people are aware of it) and no one has any doubts that Chrysler ordered the employee fired, and then fired the agency when that order blew up in its face. Interestingly, several mentioned a company that used Eminem in its ads should be able to handle an accidental f-bomb.

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

OK everyone pay up. I was right. CBS has now reported the employee did make the mistake I mentioned of running more than one account from his phone and posting to the wrong stream.

BUT now we have other questions. Chrysler fired the agency. This put 20 people out of work (so the Agency claims). I frame the next question blindly. Should Chrysler have fired the agency. What else was the agency doing for Chrysler? 20 people is a lot. How long has the Agency been working with Chrysler? Was the work good enough and for long enough to prevent the firing? Obviously not. But was it good enough to say Chrysler over reacted?

Did Groupon fire CPB for the horrible Superbowl Ads? Wasn't those worse?

gyrlbanket
gyrlbanket

As a student I am weary of mistakes like this so it is refreshing to hear your professional perspective. I totally agree that social media should be handled in-house, that is one of the benefits of social media as opposed to traditional media platforms. The blame should not fall on one person here; there are some valuable takeaways for all involved parties (client, agency, and individual).

AbbieF
AbbieF

We all have all made mistakes in our careers-my first project here at HMA comes to mind. It had to do with Vanna White and the mattress company she was spokesperson for -- to this day I don't know which one it was. But we owned up to it, made good and moved on. We had the client for several years.

Difference is back in the good old days, you know, before the Internet, we weren't in such a hurry to get things done and out the door. We took a little more time to review information. And mistakes were still made. Today's instant, gotta get it out now, world we live in, means more mistakes are made and they're made faster.

Gini, I agree, we may never know exactly what happened here. Whether it was a mistake like Chrysler or Red Cross, or insensitivity like Kenneth Cole and the AFLAC guy, technology gives us great power but with it comes great responsibility. So once again, be careful what you Tweet.

lindaforrest
lindaforrest

The errant Tweet and Chrysler's response has got people talking, that's for sure. Agreed that we all make mistakes, but this was a particularly unfortunate one, given the "Imported from Detroit" campaign that the company had recently launched. Ultimately, this gaffe could be perceived as a boost for the company's brand, if you subscribe to the theory about any publicity being good publicity...

We wrote today about how companies can avoid these sorts of mistakes by implementing concise yet effective social media policies; this incident is no excuse to avoid outsourcing your social media activity as it could have just as easily happened to an internal resource. Read more: http://bit.ly/g17B4G

shanajcpr
shanajcpr

Agreed-- it can certainly be rough to handle more than one account, and I feel bad for the person who made the mistake. It's unfortunate they had to be fired. :(

Keena Lykins
Keena Lykins

Gini,

Your post brought back some stomach-churning memories of mistakes past. If I had been fired for each mistake I made, I'd have had 20,000 jobs and probably be cleaning toilets by now. I think it was worse, though, when I had to call a client about a mistake someone on the team made. I felt responsible for it even then.

Personally, I think Chrysler made a big mistake in firing the agency. The Super Bowl ad was all about the company being tough, grounded, and a little gritty. That persona uses the f-bomb. Just say...

lgdrew
lgdrew

The bad part of this situation for me, is that this could have been prevented before the tweet was even written.

After tweeting to the wrong account last year, I downloaded another Twitter app on my phone and moved over my personal account so I would never have to even think about posting to a client account. No issues since.

@barryrsilver I definitely agree with this! -- "Still the proper order is Ready, Aim, Fire (or Type, Read,(pause),Send) . no matter which account is being used." -- It's easy to vent online but those feelings are usually fleeting; The internet is rather permanent...and in this case - Type, pause, do not send.

bodemuro
bodemuro

Hold on... the screen shot includes the time stamp "about 3 hours ago via web"? Am I reading that right? WEB?!

I fully understand tweeting from the wrong account on your phone, or on your Hootsuite Dashboard (if you check/uncheck the various wrong box), but ON THE WEB?! How do you "tweet from the wrong account" on web Twitter? Unbelievable.

lgdrew
lgdrew

The sad part of this situation for me, is that this could have been prevented before the tweet was even written.

After tweeting to the wrong account last year, I downloaded another Twitter app on my phone and moved over my personal account so I would never have to even think about posting to a client account. No issues since.

@barryrsilver I definitely agree with this! -- "Still the proper order is Ready, Aim, Fire (or Type, Read,(pause),Send) . no matter which account is being used." -- It's easy to vent online but those feelings are usually fleeting; The internet is rather permanent...and in this case - Type, pause, do not send.

barryrsilver
barryrsilver

P,lease help me. I'm not getting it. Cursing in public should be avoided at all costs but yes it does happen. I remember my son throwing a deity damn and he didn't learn it on Sesame Street. The unforgivable is the insult to Detroit drivers on behalf of a car manufacturer .. Then Chrysler tries a make good by firing the agency and the agency tries a make good by firing an employee and no one takes responsibility or apologizes. Any relating to the public going on? How's the image building going? Mistakes happen. I puked up a piece of customer service just last week but with experience the bells kept ringing and I corrected it within a couple of minutes.No harm done and yes I started with an apology.

Tom Martin
Tom Martin

Gini,

I cut my teeth on an airline account -- "always call the number" was a mantra... in fact, when the res folks answered, we'd just say "it's the agency" and they'd laugh..I swear I think they posted it somewhere in Res training that you can often expect our ad agency to call you.

And like you, I too made a serious error early in my career and I think our two bosses must have known each other because the response was the same -- it happens, and I'm pretty sure you'll never do that again... true to form, never have.

You're right, probably only two people in the world know the whole story. But I have to say, you just can't make that mistake. Money can be replaced, rather easily, but reputation once sullied is far more difficult to repair. I so often see agency folks (that I know are also tweeting for brands) and they're dropping F bombs and all kind of other crude stuff in their public stream... it's only a matter of time before one of those crude tweets goes out under the wrong identity.

In fact, I'm surprised agencies and brands for that matter don't do more to police employee accounts... at least for those folks that have access to the corp accounts.

Great post...

@tommartin

MARLdblE
MARLdblE

Great story Gini.

Although I agree there are many ways to look at the issue, ultimately I have to say I believe it's a matter of personal responsibility. In my opinion this person should have thought about the fact that they are managing multiple twitter accounts before they decided to make their oh so personal tweet public by accident. I think they should have considered that perhaps they lose the right to drop f-bombs via twitter because of their increase exposure. I think all of us social media users need to think before we tweet, retweet, and like. At the end of the day the individual user is control of their actions, reactions and thoughts. In that regard, I feel they should be responsible for them too. :)

Archibald
Archibald

My first thoughts upon reading the tweet were (a) awesome and (b) this is absolutely part of a campaign, not a rogue tweet. If they're hiring Eminem as a pitchman, this is exactly the kind of tweet they SHOULD be writing. I'm also suspicious of everything that happened afterward. When was the last time Chrysler got this much discussion, nineteensixtynever?

I think the biggest mistake Chrysler made was firing the company. We've all had similar thoughts, which is why it was so funny; if they had said, "we genuinely apologize to our autoworkers and anyone who took offense at our previous tweet; we'd have responded sooner, but we had to fill out this accident report," they're instant twitter legends. Instead, they respond conservatively when I'd guess that of their consumers likely to be offended by that tweet, 99% aren't even on twitter and don't care about it. And if you want the twitter demo, this kind of spineless scapegoating is the quickest way to lose them.

KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE. Chrysler didn't.

Finally, to the good gentleman who finds users of profanity "uncouth, unintelligent, and uneducated," I respectfully submit that you display those very qualities by invoking this blanket statement, and that using personal taste to define someone else speaks only to an insecurity about possessing those same qualities yourself. Manners and decency are not about using the right words or the correct fork; they're about making the other person feel comfortable, even if they fail to extend the same courtesy to you. I daresay you've done the exact opposite.

Thanks for these posts and for reading mine.

Archibald

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

I think your biggest point here, and btw @Griddy and I are proud of this post's length and depth, is why does Chrysler not have this in house? Normally the reason this get's outsourced is due to lack of resources not lack of know how.

You already know my view of the F-n F-Bomb itself. They need more F-n F-Bombs or they have to fire F-n M&M or remove him from that F-n commercial. Actually after seeing the F-n U of Michigan Fab 5 documentary last night...street cred in F-n Detroit is all about the F-Bomb. So unless they are moving their HQ to say polite Charleston South Carolina....

barryrsilver
barryrsilver

Anyone that has worked in any profession has one or two of those "OMIGOD, I've done it." moments that hopefully we survive. I don't know anything about NMS but I would assume whoever they had tweeting for Chrysler had experience because I assume Chrysler is a major account. So I ask NMS how is it possible that an experienced employee would "firebomb" drivers in Detroit on behalf of a car manufacturer HQ in Detroit, let alone use profanity publicly? What is broken in the NMS culture that allowed this to happen.?Yes something is broken. To hang it solely on the employee is to manage like an ostrich.

Lisa Gerber
Lisa Gerber

This is the social media gaffe (flavor) of the week and the firestorm is always in the reaction. Owning up to the mistake is the best way to diffuse the situation. Then we'd all be here talking about how wonderful Chrysler is. and the agency. Your story illustrates it perfectly and I am betting most of us know that feeling well. The first reaction is to find someone to whom you can't point a finger, and then, the realization (hopefully) hits that you you have to step up and take accountability yourself.

This may be one of those situations where they reacted too quickly. Or perhaps as you suggest, there were extenuating circumstances and the agency was on their way out the door anyway.

barryrsilver
barryrsilver

@meganbeausang Yes, but sometimes we all must concentrate on that which can can control. The world is rife with inequity and I agree that there exists a privileged classs that often acts at will without recourse. Having said that, I feel bad for anyone losing a job in this market. I feel as bad about a professional being unable to distinguish an open forum from a private conversation and by the way, what about all the capable drivers in Detroit?

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@Keena Lykins I'm with you. And you know what it's like on the agency side. If the client says jump, some of us ask how high. That's just not a great way to run a business.

ScottMonty
ScottMonty

@HowieG For what it's worth, it's my understanding that this was the final straw in a strained relationship. Chrysler could have mitigated the damage by waiting to make the announcement, instead of getting it wrapped up in the PR around the errant tweet.

3HatsComm
3HatsComm

@HowieG Since you brought it up, is this the first time the agency has messed up? There may be other things we'll never know. Was it just the public flub and backlash, and if so how bad has it really hurt Chrysler? Did stock prices dive, sales drop? FWIW even though I didn't care for (nor hate) the ads, I didn't leave Groupon, bought a great deal a couple weeks ago. Other than these circles, I just wonder how much this bad PR and SM negatively impacts some brands.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@lindaforrest I hate the "any publicity is good publicity" stance, but you are right that people are talking about them.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@Keena Lykins OMG! You commented on the blog! YAY!! I totally agree with you about when a client calls you about a mistake someone else makes. You do feel responsible. I think the general consensus is just that - you use Eminem in your ads and our brand becomes tough.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@lgdrew Really, really, really good idea of having two separate Twitter apps!

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@barryrsilver Yeah, I guess the difference is you (and me) wouldn't tweet the F bomb. If I were to counsel Chrysler, I would say there are MUCH better ways to handle this. Look at how the Red Cross handled their stray tweet. The publicity they could have gotten from this would have changed from still corporate to the image they began to build with the Super Bowl commercial.

dariasteigman
dariasteigman

@Tom Martin @tommartin I agree with you, Tom. I'm not surprised the employee was fired, because the message that tweet sent was that they were clueless about their client--or their client's audience. It wasn't a stupid mistake, it was an act of amazing stupidity. I wouldn't want people that stupid (or immature) working for me, and I'd think twice about hiring an agency that has that caliber of employee.

You can make a mistake, but you can't bad-mouth the hand that feeds you and expect to keep getting fed.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@Tom Martin "It's the agency" makes me laugh! You know, I was thinking about this comment when I was walking to a meeting earlier. I think this goes to a strong social media policy. If NMS had "no F bombs" in their policy, the employee deserved to be fired. If not, well, they'd better now!

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@MARLdblE I agree with being responsible, but I also think it's a bit over-the-top to fire someone for a mistake any of us could have made. Sure, I would NEVER tweet the F bomb, but we once lost a client because I tweeted that Keanu Reeves is gay (in response to a GF who LOVES him) and the client took it as my being homophobic. I'm not, but that's what it left him with. So ... I guess I took responsibility for that silly tweet in the same way.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@Archibald I ALMOST included in the blog post that I know some people were going to say this was done on purpose. In fact, when I was doing my research, I asked a few friends what they thought and more than one said exactly what you did. I don't know...it seems like great lengths to go (firing an agency) for a little <bad> publicity.

bdorman264
bdorman264

@HowieG @Griddy Can I crash this party? Well said Howie, I mean it's the freakin' motor city w/ M&M and Kid Rock as their spokespeople/image. I would expect an f-bomb even from Chrysler.

Unfortunately, everyone thought Chrysler was hip and edgy.....still too corporate.....and why don't they work on making a better car.........not there yet.

Too bad they were quick to throw someone under the bus and to no avail. I agree w/ @ginidietrich you better stand behind your employees, unless there was something else going on and this was just the final straw.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@barryrsilver My guess is the employee was a 20-something who probably WAS frustrated and has no problem tweeting that from (his?) personal account. There are lots and lots and lots of junior people at agencies working on major accounts. When I was at FH, I was put in charge of a $6M account...with only three years experience. You just don't have enough time in the business, at that point, to know what's right and wrong. But I suppose that's why the entire agency was fired the next day. I just think it's over-the-top.

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

@barryrsilver I had mentioned Friday the person was in the car and on their mobile. If using Hootsuite and managing a personal account and a client account like I do this can happen inadvertently. I did it 2 weeks ago. But since my personal account is my business account I am very tame at what I say. I think it was a technology snafu not an intent to use the Chysler account.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@Lisa Gerber I wish I'd thought about this before I wrote the post. You know how this same thing happened to the Red Cross (but it was #tigerblood instead of the F bomb)? Look at how differently that was handled. Stiff corporate vs "oops" we made a mistake.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@barryrsilver @meganbeausang I'm pretty sure (having had this same conversation with clients before) that the agency was more afraid of losing the business in this economy. It's too bad they fired the guy and then got fired, too. That's why a client will never run our business: I can remove the person from the account, but unless the person is on probation and already close to being fired, a client cannot dictate what we do with our team.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@ScottMonty @HowieG I also heard the agency was on thin ice. I get that, but agree they should have waited. I hope they take the social media in-house now.

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

@ScottMonty Scott! I am so stoked you came here! Wow Gini is a true Supa star! LOL Thanks for the input. Its interesting because it has been seeming to me the kicker here was Chrysler using M&M and being upset over the F-Bomb which has technically put them in a conflicting position. Do they want M&M for street cred or do they want the Pope?

And thanks @3HatsComm for the always great omment.

Scott Ford tweets internally correct vs outsourcing that?

lindaforrest
lindaforrest

@ginidietrich @lindaforrest I'm not a fan either but it did give company execs the opportunity to further drive home their key messages in their latest campaign about their ties to and support for Detroit. Any excuse to reinforce your brand attributes to your marketplace is probably a good thing. And the voice of Chrysler's brass holds more weight than that of the now fired third-party Tweeter.

3HatsComm
3HatsComm

@ginidietrich @lgdrew Done the same, different Twitter apps for different accounts, just remove as many opportunities to screw up as you can. ;-)

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@bdorman264 @HowieG @Griddy Bill is back! Bill is back! Bill is back!

I thought you guys would like the length. When I got to the end of my personal story, I was already at 500 words and I panicked!

barryrsilver
barryrsilver

@HowieG In their car and on their mobile opens up an entirely different can of worms. Still the proper order is Ready, Aim, Fire (or Type, Read,(pause),Send) . no matter which account is being used. Still goes back (partially) to corporate culture.

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

@ScottMonty @3HatsComm I suspected you did this in house Scott because of your background. I am actually surprised most Fortune 200 companies don't do all their marketing/advertising in house since they have the money too, but I know it's not a core competency and why have permanent staff when it can be outsourced. I know from Chris Baccus, ATT does the same. He even responds on twitter directly from their account sometimes. It is good policy.

That would of been slick blaming M&M! lol Though wonder if @ginidietrich would call that a proper PR move!

Have a great weekend!

ScottMonty
ScottMonty

@HowieG@3HatsComm

They could have avoided the whole thing by blaming the tweet on Eminem. :-)

Yes, Ford handles Twitter with Ford staff. We use agency support to help with creation and curation of content on Facebook, but again, we respond personally there as well.

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

@barryrsilver you are correct Barry. And I also wonder about the age of the person. I have gotten to know quite a few Gen-Yers who blog about how to market to their generation. They brag about short attention spans and rapid fire communication. But this is an Org issue because that doesn't hold in the work place. When you are 16 yes. But 25 working for a company no.

Lisa Gerber
Lisa Gerber

@HowieG there, I removed them, but I maintain my points by adding these two benign comments.

Trackbacks

  1. […] Gini Dietrich and others have already weighed in on this issue, but I have my own take that I thought I should share. […]

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  5. Twit Happens says:

    […] running multiple accounts and you send a personal message over a business account, (i.e. Chrysler). Twit […]

  6. […] Don’t stare into the lights. Ever been on a stage to face the spotlight? The piercing glare can paralyze and disorient even the most seasoned performers. Take a lesson and keep your field of vision wide. Stay receptive to what’s happening on the stage around you and in the audience. A high level of awareness will help you respond to a snafu with grace and style (think Red Cross, not Chrysler). […]

  7. […] Don’t stare into the lights. Ever been on a stage to face the spotlight? The piercing glare can paralyze and disorient even the most seasoned performers. Take a lesson and keep your field of vision wide. Stay receptive to what’s happening on the stage around you and in the audience. A high level of awareness will help you respond to a snafu with grace and style (think Red Cross, not Chrysler). […]

  8. […] Don’t stare into the lights. Ever been on a stage to face the spotlight? The piercing glare can paralyze and disorient even the most seasoned performers. Take a lesson and keep your field of vision wide. Stay receptive to what’s happening on the stage around you and in the audience. A high level of awareness will help you respond to a snafu with grace and style (think Red Cross, not Chrysler). […]

  9. […] the tweet revealing something unique? Think Arab Spring or Chrysler’s mishandled Detroit driver tweet or the unexpected marketing coup the Red Cross earned for itself and Dogfish Head […]

  10. […] It’s already begun…and the election is still 14 months away. It’s another Chrysler F bomb story, but in the Massachusetts Senate race. A top aide for Scott Brown apparently is behind the […]

  11. […] such as Chrysler, Kenneth Cole, and CelebBoutique have all made the mistake of tweeting something offensive from the […]

  12. […] such as Chrysler, Kenneth Cole, andCelebBoutiquehave all made the mistake of tweeting something offensive from the […]

  13. […] the tweet revealing something unique? Think Arab Spring or Chrysler’s mishandled Detroit driver tweet or the unexpected marketing coup the Red Cross earned for itself and Dogfish Head […]

  14. […] such as Chrysler, Kenneth Cole, and CelebBoutique have all made the mistake of tweeting something offensive from the […]