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Gini Dietrich

Caught in the Busy Trap: Is it Making Us Less Productive?

By: Gini Dietrich | July 9, 2012 | 
170

A couple of weeks ago, the New York Times had a great OpEd about how busy we are.

The author, Tim Kreider, relayed a story about asking a friend to blow off work to check out the new American Wing at the Met and the friend said he was super busy, but to let him know if there was a special event or something and he’d try to make it.

Kreider said, “This is the special event. I’m inviting you to go with me.”

But the idea this friend of his would skip work just to go hang out is so foreign to a lot (most?) of us.

How many of you fall into this trap? When someone asks you how you are, you say, “OMG. I’m crazy busy!” And the person responds with, “Better than the alternative!”

The Busy Trap

We’ve fallen into, what Kreider calls, the busy trap.

Erica Allison explored this same idea in Sometimes, You Just Gotta Boogie! She explained that she over-schedules her life. So much so, in fact, it’s impossible for her to enjoy life because she’s too busy getting from one thing to another.

But she had an epiphany…accidentally. Her phone’s battery died and she was stuck at a concert without the ability to tweet, Facebook, text, or take photos.

At a concert without a phone!

After getting over the initial shock, she said,

I’m so glad I didn’t bring my phone. I danced. I laughed. I watched with delight the world around me. I even talked to strangers.

We’re so focused on being responsive 24/7 that we forget to life our lives.

Creating Less Noise

Last November, we decided to go completely virtual. We gave up the River North office space and the Gini Dietrich cafeteria (four-star and James Beard-winning restaurant, Naha) in favor of staff meetings via Skype and doing laundry in the middle of the day.

At first, it was hard. The computer was always on and emails were coming in at all times of the day and night.

And then the new year hit and I decided “focus” was one of my resolutions. I know, that’s broad, but I knew what it meant.

I stopped working weekends. What I discovered is, on Fridays, I would tell myself I could do whatever needed to be done over the weekend and I wasn’t productive that work day at all. It turns out, I’m more productive and efficient without weekend work.

Then we had 80 degree temperatures in March (nearly unheard of), but it was still too dark to ride at 6 a.m. So I started riding at noon. And I didn’t feel guilty about it (well, I did at first) because I was starting work around 5:00 or 5:30.

A ride at lunchtime is the perfect break. I’ve already worked six or seven hours and it gives me time to clear my head and think. Plus I’m rocking a serious cycling tan, which I wouldn’t have if I were still riding in the wee early morning hours.

And, most recently, I’ve started leaving my phone at home (gasp!) for a few hours on one day of every weekend (typically Sundays).

You know what has happened? NOTHING. The world has not fallen apart and no one misses me for a few hours.

Sure, my travel schedule still impedes my social life (five more weeks!), but overall I’m not getting caught in the busy trap.

The Best Part

But do you know what the best part is? I’m HAPPY. I haven’t been this happy…ever.

I’m tan, I’m in great shape, I’m racing again, my relationships are strong, and the business is growing more quickly than it has in our history.

I’m focused, I’m efficient, I’m productive, and (did I mention?) I’m happy.

How are you getting yourself out of the busy trap?

About Gini Dietrich


Gini Dietrich is the founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich, an integrated marketing communications firm. She is the author of Spin Sucks, co-author of Marketing in the Round, and co-host of Inside PR. She also is the lead blogger at Spin Sucks and is the founder of Spin Sucks Pro.

160 comments
autumnmthompson
autumnmthompson

I took my daughter to see The Lion King last week.  I decided no phone.  We were going to enjoy the show together.  We perched in our balcony seats to see people busy themselves with taking pictures and posting to their social network.  There were four women sitting on the railing of their box squeezing together to get the perfect "Here we are!" picture.  My daughter wondered outloud why they were doing it. And if they fell would that mean the Fire Dept. would stop the show?  We had a great time for 2 1/2 hours enjoying the music, costumes, and performers.  Did I get phone calls?  Yes.  Did I get e-mails?  Yes.  Did I have the best time creating a lasting memory offline? Absolutely!  (And I'm pretty sure no one missed me.)

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

We need European work lives. 4-6 weeks of vacation. Siestas. Etc.

I am never surprised when the Pew Research studies show people in Europe so much happier than we are in the US and much more content.

lauraclick
lauraclick

That NY Times Op Ed was awesome. I read it multiple times when it came out. I need to print it out and stick it next to my computer screen! The problem is we're addicted to this crazy busy mess. And, we let it control us. It's all wrong. And, I'm incredibly guilty.

 

I had your revelation a few years back when I worked at a non-profit. When you're in fundraising, the job is never done and there are never enough hands to do the work. So, I often worked weekends in addition to working during the week. Much like you, I realized that I was always so fizzled out by Friday, those days were an utter waste. I quickly learned that if I quit working on the weekend, I would have the energy to be more efficient and get the work done during the actual work week.

 

Truth is, this is a great reminder. I need to hit the reset button and do what I did back then. After moonlighting for two years and always working nights/weekends on top of my day job, it's hard to untrain myself of this! I think somehow we're tricked into thinking we HAVE to work all the time. Like the article said, we wear our business and the hours we put in with a badge of honor. It needs to stop!

 

So glad you've found your happy place! :)

workmommywork
workmommywork

Funny that you posted this. I got in a conversation on Twitter earlier this week about that New York Times article (someone I connected with alerted me to it when they noticed my profile included "searching for work-life balance." I read the article and felt immediately guilty.

 

I have my own marketing company and ostensibly work for myself so that I have the flexibility to enjoy life. The  problem is I often find myself forgoing "life" in favor of work. The worst part is that my kids are still young and I also let work get in the way of my being more involved in their lives. The article was a great wake up call that reminded me not to let the opportunities I'm faced with day in and day out pass me by. It's easy to say to yourself that you'll work hard now  so that you can enjoy the fruits of your labor "later," but for some people, later never comes.

 

I was reminded of this recently when a good friend of mine (and the mother of three young kids) was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor. She has chosen to spend her remaining time with her kids and crossing things off her bucket list, and her experience made me realize that we should all live like we only have six months left. It would really put our priorities in perspective.

 

Thanks for posting!

KensViews
KensViews

This is FABULOUS. You decided to focus on what's really important. I'm both proud of, and happy for you. I'm going to quote your post in my classes on time management. And if you reply with something snarky, I'm going to have Kelly do some "withholding"!

tressalynne
tressalynne

Love this! I recently took the first 'real' vacation in 11 years (that is, not just a few days tacked onto a business trip or long weekend where I'd still check emails, voice messages, handle biz, etc.). My mom had completed a third round of chemo (over the past 3 years) and my sister and I decided we needed a family group vacation. Went to a beach in Mexico, purposely did NOT get the Mexico calling or data package, arranged for someone to cover all my business-related activities, and REALLY vacationed.  I, like you, was surprised that the world did not fall apart while I was gone ;).

 

And, now wonder, what took me so long to realize that we all need real breaks from business & technology?!  I hope more people read this and realize it, too! :) 

judiek914
judiek914

@DanielleCyr @ginidietrich and if you don't want to follow their advice, call Judie Kaplan Personal Concierge!

etelligence
etelligence

You may not have known this, but I don't own a smartphone. Or a home phone. Only a trac phone that is dead or out of minutes 80% of the time. I don't carry it anywhere turned on. It has costed 60$ in minutes this year.

 

Like you said, nothing goes to hell when you ditch full time connectivity. 10 years ago we weren't subjected to that. I know too many people who get anxious when they forget their phone, that can't be healthy. From time to time I'll get the urge to sign up on a new contract and plug back in, but then I think of how much people incessantly texting aggravates me, and I forget about it. Sometimes I feel like I'm the only person in the world who still experiences freedom :( Since when was 150$ per month for phone service a must have commodity anyway?

mdirocco
mdirocco

@ginidietrich Great post. I wrote a blog post coming out later this week, inspired by the same NYT article. Will send you the link.

TheJackB
TheJackB

I used to respond to all of my emails within moments of receiving them. Over time it got to be ridiculous because the amount I received made doing so untenable.

 

More importantly, most simply weren't important enough to require an immediate response. Once I stopped responding so quickly I found a lot of "missing time."

 

But it took effort to do it and to train people not to freak out if I didn't respond the second I got their message.

annedreshfield
annedreshfield

So much fun to read about how you and your business changed, Gini! I'm similar to you that I try to really step away from work on the weekend. I allow myself to check my phone for emails a few times during the day, and even then I just skim -- if something screams out that it's important, then I'll open it and read it. I'm living with my grandparents this summer, and I can tell they don't like it when I'm on my phone all the time, so I've started "neglecting" it (aka living life like a normal person, I suppose!). I had the same exact reaction you did. I was pleasantly surprised at how nice it was to be without it and feeling the need to constantly check it...and yeah, the world didn't end! A few times people have tried to contact me when I'm out and about, and they survived without hearing back from me right away. AMAZING.

 

What else? I've cut way back on television (except that I'm tuning into all of the sports, between tennis and the Olympics), and I've picked up golf on the weekends. I try to get out and get some fresh air every day, whether it's a 10 minute walk in the middle of the day, or a two mile walk around the golf course after dinner, when it's still beautiful outside. If I want to do something like lounge around outside and read all day on the weekend, I let myself do it without feeling guilty. Following what will make me happy in that moment has improved my overall happiness and relaxation, I think. It's a great feeling.

KevinVandever
KevinVandever

Great! I decided to live this way months ago, now it's going to be a trend (just hurt my arm patting myself on the back). 

 

A few ways I'm escaping the busy trap:

1. I take my vacations and regular time off. Sounds simple, but it's amazing how many people don't do it. In fact, I often hear people bragging about how much vacation time they've accrued. As a leader in my department, I'm not only escaping my own trap, but trying to help others to do the same...while also proving that productivity won't suffer, and may even improve because of well-rested and energized peeps.

2. More time with family. This has already been mentioned, but I agree with the idea of having breakfast with family. During the school year, I eat breakfast with my youngest daughter every morning (she gets up too late during the summer). My oldest daughter works near me and we now make time to have lunch together at least once a week.

3. I changed my attitude about being busy and "killing time". I no longer look at  naps, reading fiction,  listening to music. and hanging with friends as "time killers". I look at them as activities that are as important as anything else I do. 

 

Thanks for the post. I think it's an important topic. We sometimes move too fast and our priorities get messed up. It's nice to take some time to reevaluate and make necessary tweaks. 

 

OK, gotta run. Way too busy to stay on this site all day. 

StephanieFlo
StephanieFlo

Great insights Gini! Love hearing how happy this transition is making you. Creating less noise is something I've done over the last two months with my blog and social media in general. I took time to reflect on my direction and what I wanted to share. The time away allowed me to focus on what was happening in real life and realize I'm never to busy for the important stuff - saying yes to invitations, enjoying the new city where I had moved and spending time catching up with family and friends in the city I left. The reward? In three days I've drafted three fresh blog posts and am feeling energized to jump back into the swing of things.

C_Pappas
C_Pappas

I am SO caught up in this notion of finding happiness as of late. I cannot tell you how many times a day I hit that home key on my iPhone to see if I missed a call or text - I am literally annoying myself. I love that you leave your phone at home but the second I do that I panic ' what if my car breaks down?' 'what if something happens to my parents?' the usual stuff. I admit I need to exercise but I am eating healthier and that is helping with my energy level. Aside from releasing myself from the phone (which is least likely to happen), I need someone to steal my TV remote or the entire TV. I get so sucked into it and realized hours went by. This does nothing to help me relax, rejuvenate or get anything done. My 'busy-ness' when I am not at work is typically doing nothing but I often say I am oh so busy because it sounds better. I bet Tim Kreider's friend is not as busy as he says he is if he can take off work at selected times (for an event maybe?). We all like to be busy and it's just hard to cut the cord and stop once in awhile.

mdbarber
mdbarber

I've been seeing a considerable pendulum shift in this way all year. Focus is one of my priorities for the year as well. So far it's manifesting itself in doing one thing at a time instead of 15 and also in turning off the social media channels for certain time periods of the day. I believe doing this and also enjoying the weekend will help us all be healthier, and make for stronger relationships.

Latest blog post:

PJWright
PJWright

Thanks for the reminder Gini.  Isn't it amazing to find out how much of that busy was really not busy but rather "make work" after all?  Every few months I have to remind myself to concentrate on the important things and let the other take care of itself.

AnneReuss
AnneReuss

@MissVersatile whoa miss! I gotta check out that new avi

jepelp
jepelp

I enjoyed your reply. Collaboration is often required due to the plethora of information. I posted some quotes on jimparrishavitator.com

sanderssays
sanderssays

@hackmanj Thanks for sharing the insights.

hackmanj
hackmanj

I guess it is all about balance, this one has swung to both extremes for me (but usually the opposite - not enough scheduling and work but this was largely in the past 2003-2006) over the years. I'd add:

 

1. Allow yourself time for a daily power nap. (10-15 minutes at 3PM is bliss)

2. Don't check your Email/electronics when you wake up. Have breakfast with your family, etc. first (compliments of @sanderssays )

 

I am completely impressed you are leaving your cell phone home for two hours, but you might want to extend that time. :)

rachaelseda
rachaelseda

This is a lesson that I think requires ongoing learning, adjusting and prioritizing but ultimately it's so important. At the end of the day I always remind myself that my relationships with my family and friends are one of my biggest priorities because without them there's no reason to celebrate my little successes in life! Great post Gini. I'm glad you're doing well and you're happy. I definitely need to see this cyclist tan...I think it might become my new thing to tease you about (hey you do make it so easy! hehe). 

John_Trader1
John_Trader1

This is a very timely post Gini. A lot of people seem to forget the important role that happiness, peace and tranquility play in our ability to effectively do our professional jobs. Although I work in a highly stressful industry with insane hours and massive time commitments, I do my best to balance my time by staying physically active and recently, I've been trying to live by the philosophy of:  Seize joy. That only seems to come from injecting more non-work activities in my life. 

Hajra
Hajra

A nice reminder. What works for me is saying no to certain things and actually believing that some things can actually wait. I do have a little bit of hyperactivity issues (yes, mom I accept it!) and that lead me to doing everything, all at once and right NOW. The truth is some things can wait. And the world doesn't come to an end if you take some time out for yourself. You just recharge to be better! 

magriebler
magriebler

Gini, I can't tell you how refreshing it is to read this post. How lovely to work for a boss like you, who understands that companies benefit when employees have time for genuine rest and relaxation. It's impossible to be creative when you've burnt the candle at both ends and then chewed on the wick because your fingernails are already non-existent.

 

But as you know, this is not a reality at many companies. And now I'm asking for some real advice. Especially in PR, there can be an expectation that you should be on call 24/7, sometimes for genuine emergencies -- which do happen -- and sometimes to calm anxious executive nerves or stroke client egos. What's been your experience with helping clients/upper management understand that you're not on call 7 days a week and don't need to be in order to do an outstanding job? Thanks!

RebeccaTodd
RebeccaTodd

I am so happy for you Gini! It really is amazing how freeing it can be to step away from the idea we must be in constant productive motion or we have failed. During my home office days, I would always be at my computer by 6:30 am, but would take a yoga break mid morning and a dog walk mid afternoon. Kept me refreshed and able to work through until 10 pm. For me, the switch from corporate to academia has been liberating.  Gone are 80 hour work weeks, 8 am Sunday staff meetings, and 10 pm conference calls. I still check my email on the weekends in case I have a customer in crisis, but I do not set tasks for my weekends any longer.

 

I also learned a great lesson when I left my phone at work a few Fridays back.  We have summer hours and end at 1 Friday, meaning I was smartphone-less from then until Monday morning.  I don't have a land line, and left my laptop at work too. It was so liberating! The first few hours, my fingers were literally buzzing when I would think of my phone. Tingling with the desire to be touching for information. It was an incredible weekend- I simply did what I wanted to and was completely unconcerned with the broader universe. I have actually noticed a marked difference in how and when I use my phone since.  It made me hyper-aware of connectivity addiction. I love your idea of smartphone-free Sundays. I will attempt implementation forthwith. 

 

And as I saw you comment below, isn't it amazing what fresh air and regular exercise can do for you, body, mind, and soul? I sleep better, I work more efficiently, and I am so much more centered. 

 

samtaracollier
samtaracollier

Good for you Gini! I didn't know you went completely paperless and office-less!! I started doing the same thing in January and it's great - except I started gaining weight as I didn't start going to the gym (big mistake on my part).  I think creating a schedule is great too, as in, no work on the weekends. 

 

I miss your restaurant Naha! I'll never forget wine and tapas with you :) 

annethewriter
annethewriter

Thanks for the reminder Gini!  Time to go do some yoga on the dock.  The proposal I'm working on will still be here an hour from now.  :)

Anne

bhas
bhas

This is one aspect of my life that needs looking at. I am not busy in the sense that I could not postpone work and go catch up with a friend on an hour's notice. But I do need to work harder at setting boundaries between sitting in front of the computer, and doing other stuff.

 

For a single guy w/o any family obligations it gets hard to tear yourself off. And efficiency dips, because I always have this feeling that yeah, "There would be time to fix that. Let's read some more Cracked".

 

Maybe I should get myself a girlfriend that nags a little

Brent@Echelonseo.com
Brent@Echelonseo.com

Great article Gini! I am into year 2 of running my own business, and have just recently moved into a home office. I am struggling with the boundaries of life and work - guilt, stress, exercise (back into cycling also), play, relaxation. I appreciate hearing about your experience and advice on the subject.

jepelp
jepelp

I found out when I returned to my exercise program my energy levels and my productivity increased in other areas. I am 71 meditate, exercise, and maintain an active life.

jennimacdonald
jennimacdonald

Congrats Gini. I'm really glad that you wrote this article today. I've been reading a lot lately on this subject and I realized that life is too short. I've been trying not to work on the weekends either, and tone it down during the week. I want to make sure I hit the gym every night (M-F) and have a healthy dinner at home. These are small, minimal things but they make me so happy. 

 

Yesterday I was actually feeling guilty about my relaxation on the weekends, and I thought I should write today. I didn't write, I went grocery shopping instead. : )

 

My focus has become my long term goal, a family. I realized I wont be finding one by sitting alone in front of my computer 24/7. I need to take a break and get out there and think about things besides social media. 

 

BTW working on buying my first bike, read a great article in Outside Mag for the best bikes for beginners that wont cost you your paycheck. Stay tuned...

jepelp
jepelp

Gini, You have hit on something that will return dividends as we age. I am 71 and went through a period where work replaced exercise. I now work out daily and meditate and I am getting more done.

kategroom
kategroom

Ouch! You are onto something here. And Gini, since we know each other so well, here is my story.

 

At the start of the year my business partner and I got committed to 'our thing together' in a new way. We decided to meet a couple times a week to plan, prioritise, make calls together and, well,  drink coffee. (We also work remotely, and our joint business came from two separate businesses). 

 

There was quite a bit of coffee and spending time together. Not quite my way of doing things as I too have it that more hours = hard work.

 

I took my lists and folders and files and plans, and .... we would talk about much more general stuff. At first it seemed to me like an indulgence, but it was a time filled with energy, and enjoyment and we got so much done during the rest of the week.  Gradually I learned to relax and enjoy the time, and took fewer folders!

 

Our fledgling business really got going! I was happier then then than I have EVER been. Truly phenomenal. Then some things happened (busy stuff) and the meetings stopped for a bit.

 

Things are still good (very blessed), but gee those get togethers make a difference. Time together is important - even when we don't have time. It's a huge part of where our magic comes from. It's happy-making stuff. 

 

Apart from the creeping realisation that I'm more effective if I don't work at the weekend. Current status: conscious and struggling with making transition. You've inspired me to keep going on this bit. Thank you! 

 

Erin F.
Erin F.

I think I'm getting myself out of it by remembering (Okay, trying.) not to set such unrealistic time frames for my goals.

Latest blog post: You Can’t Rush a Story

bradmarley
bradmarley

I have two kids. They could not care less how busy I am. They just want me to play Customer with them. (It's a game my two-year-old made up. Don't judge.) So, for me, making sure I get my work done in the allotted time is important because, when I go home, I'm largely unavailable.

 

However, if I don't have a list of things I need to do, I'm lost. It's not uncommon to wander aimlessly through my email, landing upon things I need to do.

 

To summarize, staying focused on a list and leaving time for my kids helps me to try and escape the busy trap.

bdorman264
bdorman264

I'm VERY busy unless it's golf or a ball game.....or free food and drink. 

 

I currently sit on 4 boards, have a day job and incredibly popular in social.........I still have plenty of down time and sometimes I feel guilty if I'm not doing something with it. Successful people seem to be plenty busy but have the best use of their time. 

 

Ok, not 'incredibly' popular but I do have 7 subscribers to my blog..........not counting my mother and me........

TonyBennett
TonyBennett

I'm tan and happy, too - we have a lot in common (except I'm not exactly in tiptop shape)! This post is spot on... It comes down to separating the "urgent" yet not important stuff from the important items that need to be completed. See you tonight, Gini!!

DavidSafeer
DavidSafeer

Great article and example of someone taking control of their life. I continually review my expectations for myself and eliminate the unnecessary and mundane. The challenge? Sometime those same things seem SO important! Usually they are Only important to ourselves not to clients, friends, spouses, our children and others that we think we are doing the "stuff" for.

adriandayton
adriandayton

@ginidietrich loved that article. When I think of busy people...you are one of the people I think of :)

BestRoofer
BestRoofer

Very happy for you Gini!  I'm trying to think of a way I can work in a ride during the day.

KenMueller
KenMueller

This is why I love working for myself, and from home. I can walk the dog, do the laundry, whip something up in the kitchen, take the kids somewhere...at any time. And I love it. Yes, there are moments when I'm working at 10pm, but that's rare. Our lives right now are VERY open to last minute decisions and change, and it's fun!

 

I'll even take time off to go grocery shopping with Becky in the middle of the day, because that's 'enjoyable and relaxing for me.

KDillabough
KDillabough

I refuse to be "too busy", simple as that."Busy" used to be a badge of honour: now it's an epidemic. The cure? Step away from all the busy-ness and realize, as you did @ginidietrich , that the sun will rise tomorrow and the world won't explode if you press pause, re-evaluate and do what's really important. In my world, it's about scheduling your priorities, not prioritizing your schedule.

 

I'm delighted to say that I lead a blessed life: I do what I want, and I want to do what I do. I'm never too busy for what's important: family, friends, experiences, life! I wish for everyone to abandon busy-ness, embrace imbalance and enjoy the ride. Cheers! Kaarina

PhilipNowak
PhilipNowak

 @ginidietrich  I feel the same way as you. I used to work non-stop at my day job and on @firmology  every waking hour 7 days a week. I've found that I am more productive if I don't work on weekends and try to disconnect from technology as much as possible. I'm also trying to go to sleep earlier during the business week since I wake up at 4:30am to go to the gym, but that's a tough one. I'll get there!

mcahalane
mcahalane

There's some inspiration! RT @allenmireles Caught in the Busy Trap: Is it Making Us Less Productive? via @SpinSucks http://t.co/cAz5p0do

allenmireles
allenmireles

 @ginidietrich One of the things I love most about working virtually is the ability to put things on hold for a bike ride or walk. Or work late into the night when it feels right or is needed. And, I frequently turn off the cellphone and unplug from Twitter, Facebook and the rest of it, on the weekend almost altogether. I'm not sure I would recognize the fabled "balance" in life that so many speak of, but these are some of the ways I strive to achieve a semblance of it.

Latest blog post: Marketing for Nonprofits

rdopping
rdopping

By reading more blogs like this...:-P

 

Well, really, you make great points here and the best one is that you can leave the "on-line" world behind for a few hours here and there.

 

In a similar manner, I also got trapped in the "I can get that done over the weekend" mentality. Fortunately, I have been able to focus a little more directly during the day. Unlike you, I don't run a business but I do have a very busy work life and the more I achieve there the busier I get. Progress, achievement and drive to get better is a never ending cycle. Since starting my blog a year ago I find it even more challenging because I only get to read and engage in my off hours so I tend to ensure my focus at work is the best it can be so I can clear some me time for other pursuits.

 

Oh, and I am happy too. I just wish you would like me.....:-(

Latest blog post:

Justjeffpls
Justjeffpls

@ginidietrich I'm glad I retired very early.

jasonkonopinski
jasonkonopinski

That op-ed caught a lot of attention since it first published. Coincidentally, I wrote a post last week in response. You know what this means? I SCOOPED GINI DIETRICH. :)

 

Much like you, I thrive when I have a clear sense of the projects in front of me, the tasks that I need to scratch off (and I prioritize those in a GSD list). When I first started working remotely in 2007, my routine was important to setting the tone for the day. It had to be the very same as if I was getting into my car as driving to the office, else it was easy to slip into the mentality of, well, I'm not really working. Now, I'm a strong proponent of workshifting. I don't have to be in my 'office' to be productive. Sometimes that means holing up in a local coffee shop or feet up on the back porch. 

 

Some of my friends are incredible workaholics, working almost non-stop into the very early morning hours and consuming massive amounts of caffeine to compensate (most of them are web developers/programmers, coincidentally) - and there is a part of me that sees thinks that is very sad. A burnout is on the horizon for a quite a few. Startup life isn't easy, but you have to know when to take a few days off. 

Latest blog post: Poetry Friday: John Ashbery

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  3. […] Yesterday afternoon, Allen Mireles and I were talking about our to-do lists. Not from the aspect of how busy we are, but in how we track everything so balls don’t get […]

  4. […] phone. But, it’s really okay to be uplugged every once and awhile. In fact, it’s good for us. Go outside. Hang with your friends and family. Heck, you can even leave your phone at home. When you do that, […]

  5. […] Caught in the Busy Trap: Is It Making Us Less Productive? (Spin Sucks) […]

  6. […] are always quick to complain that we are too busy or don’t have enough hours in the day. But, if you give a long, hard look at where you spend […]

  7. […] afternoon, Allen Mireles and I were talking about our to-do lists. Not from the aspect of how busy we are, but in how we track everything so balls don’t get […]