Guest

How to Piss-Off Your Customers without Really Trying

By: Guest | November 8, 2010 | 
62

Guest post by Carol Roth, author of the Unsolicited Business Advice blog and The Entrepreneur Equation.

After a recent stay in Vegas (for business, of course…), on the night before check out, I received a letter on my nightstand. I walked over to the full-sized, high-quality parchment and read the first few words:

“Dear Valued Guest”

There isn’t much that could make me feel less valued than the phrase Dear Valued Guest.

The letter went on to thank me for my business and offer a special rate if I wanted to extend my stay, but I couldn’t get past how ridiculous this note was.

Just because you say something, it doesn’t make it true or believable.

If I were a valued guest, the hotel would have taken the extra time to address me by name. Perhaps they would have noted something about my stay – that I had twice dined at a particular restaurant or that I hadn’t visited the spa as I usually do – and tied their offer to my particular actions. But no, they just sent a generic letter and tried to pass it off as something special. This actually had the opposite effect the note was ostensibly trying to achieve.

Businesses have to realize customers aren’t stupid. With all of the choices we have available, we are paying more attention to the details, to service levels, and to companies that walk the talk – as well as those that do not. Just because you say you are the best, that you care about service, or that I am a valued guest does not make it true. You need to show me.

It’s difficult enough to get a customer’s attention these days, but when you have a customer already patronizing your business, it is totally a boneheaded move to drop the ball. Fancy parchment paper isn’t a substitute for real customer engagement – for showing a customer that she is valued instead of just saying it.

With all of the talk about fancy new strategies and tactics for marketing and customer relationships, too many businesses are forgetting that little personal details show that you are willing to go the extra mile. That is what makes someone feel like a special customer, a VIP, or a “Valued Guest.”

Actions speak louder than words in the eyes of a customer.

Carol Roth helps businesses grow and make more money. An investment banker, business strategist, and deal maker, her Unsolicited Business Advice blog was recently named as one of the top 10 small business blogs online. The Entrepreneur Equation, Carol’s book on evaluating the realities, risks, and rewards of business ownership, is due out March.

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62 responses to “How to Piss-Off Your Customers without Really Trying”

  1. TMNinja says:

    Carol,

    If you were referring to BlogWorld and a certain host hotel… I got same letter!
    And I remember thinking the same thing!

    However, taking it to a further level… this type of impersonal service actually makes bad service even worse.

    I had a bad experience with room service while staying in said hotel… and you can imagine that getting this type of letter only magnified my displeasure with them. 🙁

  2. TMNinja says:

    Carol,

    If you were referring to BlogWorld and a certain host hotel… I got same letter!
    And I remember thinking the same thing!

    However, taking it to a further level… this type of impersonal service actually makes bad service even worse.

    I had a bad experience with room service while staying in said hotel… and you can imagine that getting this type of letter only magnified my displeasure with them. 🙁

  3. DannyBrown says:

    My wife and I often eat at the local Swiss Chalet. I’m not a fan, but she likes it, so…

    Anyhoo, a few months back we’d been to Best Buy to get a Sony VAIO for my wife, and we stopped at the Chalet for dinner. We spoke with our waitress, and she was chatting about her VAIO and how it was such a great laptop.

    Two months later, we went back for dinner. The waitress immediately asked us how the VAIO was (and even remembered the colour), then asked me if I was having the same starter and drink (by name!) as I did the last time.

    I may not be a fan of the Swiss Chalet fare, but I sure as heck am a fan of their service. Like you say, it doesn’t take much but can mean the world.

  4. DannyBrown says:

    My wife and I often eat at the local Swiss Chalet. I’m not a fan, but she likes it, so…

    Anyhoo, a few months back we’d been to Best Buy to get a Sony VAIO for my wife, and we stopped at the Chalet for dinner. We spoke with our waitress, and she was chatting about her VAIO and how it was such a great laptop.

    Two months later, we went back for dinner. The waitress immediately asked us how the VAIO was (and even remembered the colour), then asked me if I was having the same starter and drink (by name!) as I did the last time.

    I may not be a fan of the Swiss Chalet fare, but I sure as heck am a fan of their service. Like you say, it doesn’t take much but can mean the world.

  5. LouBortone says:

    Ugh! Those “valued guest” letters are almost as bad as the “on-hold” messages that say “Your call is important to us.” If it was that important, you wouldn’t keep me on hold for 10 minutes and force me to listen to more commercials for your company!

  6. LouBortone says:

    Ugh! Those “valued guest” letters are almost as bad as the “on-hold” messages that say “Your call is important to us.” If it was that important, you wouldn’t keep me on hold for 10 minutes and force me to listen to more commercials for your company!

  7. emachine says:

    Hi Carol Roth

    This is a great letter written by you that should be seen and read by all establishments dealing with people. It feels that we are all being taken for granted anymore like take it or leave it. Maybe I am wrong about this but I surely enjoyed your letter. I hope that this will be read by a lot of other people also.

    Thank You
    John Antaya
    jantaya29@gmail.com

  8. emachine says:

    Hi Carol Roth

    This is a great letter written by you that should be seen and read by all establishments dealing with people. It feels that we are all being taken for granted anymore like take it or leave it. Maybe I am wrong about this but I surely enjoyed your letter. I hope that this will be read by a lot of other people also.

    Thank You
    John Antaya
    jantaya29@gmail.com

  9. AnnManion says:

    I agree Joan!

    I was speaking with a hotel e-commerce marketing manager recently about how our industry (in too many instances like the one you describe) has lost its personal connection to the hotel guest. She then went on to tell me that social media was in fact helping her property to connect in real time to individual guest needs and bring back the “personal touch”. So, lets hope we move more in that direction, and see less of the generic parchment paper salutations.

    CBS Sunday morning ran a piece on 11/7 about customer service titled “Your Call is NOT that important to us”. It is on the same theme as this blog. If anyone is interested, here is the link: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/11/07/sunday/main7031665.shtml

  10. AnnManion says:

    I agree Joan!

    I was speaking with a hotel e-commerce marketing manager recently about how our industry (in too many instances like the one you describe) has lost its personal connection to the hotel guest. She then went on to tell me that social media was in fact helping her property to connect in real time to individual guest needs and bring back the “personal touch”. So, lets hope we move more in that direction, and see less of the generic parchment paper salutations.

    CBS Sunday morning ran a piece on 11/7 about customer service titled “Your Call is NOT that important to us”. It is on the same theme as this blog. If anyone is interested, here is the link: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/11/07/sunday/main7031665.shtml

  11. Sushi says:

    @LouBortone I’m with you on this! Just tell me everyone’s busy and get on with it.

  12. Sushi says:

    @LouBortone I’m with you on this! Just tell me everyone’s busy and get on with it.

  13. caroljsroth says:

    @TMNinja Yes, that’s the hotel. I don’t even want to know your room service story…oy

  14. caroljsroth says:

    @TMNinja Yes, that’s the hotel. I don’t even want to know your room service story…oy

  15. caroljsroth says:

    @dannybrown Isn’t it amazing how something that doesn’t cost anything can have such a big impact?

  16. caroljsroth says:

    @dannybrown Isn’t it amazing how something that doesn’t cost anything can have such a big impact?

  17. caroljsroth says:

    @LouBortone Lou, I totally agree. Those kill me too! Especially the one that asked me to be a Facebook fan of my gynecologist…

  18. caroljsroth says:

    @LouBortone Lou, I totally agree. Those kill me too! Especially the one that asked me to be a Facebook fan of my gynecologist…

  19. caroljsroth says:

    @emachine Hi John
    Agreed- it doesn’t take much effort to make your customers feel like kings/queens because so many businesses just don’t care…

  20. caroljsroth says:

    @emachine Hi John
    Agreed- it doesn’t take much effort to make your customers feel like kings/queens because so many businesses just don’t care…

  21. JMattHicks says:

    Very true. All too often people and companies alike think that they are smarter than everyone else, that their half-hearted attempts wrapped in a transparent layer of elegance or hospitality will be received and embraced endearingly by the crowd that’s “not in the know.”

    We’re not idiots. We’re not stupid consumers. Even those like myself who went through the public system can see through many of their attempts. It was a generic offer that they hoped would be received warmly and personally. I don’t think it was.

  22. JMattHicks says:

    Very true. All too often people and companies alike think that they are smarter than everyone else, that their half-hearted attempts wrapped in a transparent layer of elegance or hospitality will be received and embraced endearingly by the crowd that’s “not in the know.”

    We’re not idiots. We’re not stupid consumers. Even those like myself who went through the public system can see through many of their attempts. It was a generic offer that they hoped would be received warmly and personally. I don’t think it was.

  23. MissMarcia says:

    Brilliant post, Carol! So many companies and their personnel say no when they could so easily say yes, talk instead of listen, and defend instead of rectify. I try to treat each and every one of my customers, or prospective customers (which is everyone I ever meet), as someone whose needs I am happy to be able to fill. It makes me nuts when I am the customer, and I still find I am the one trying to make the transaction work to everyone’s satisfaction, rather than the other way around. This hotel obviously thought going through the motions was good enough.

  24. MissMarcia says:

    Brilliant post, Carol! So many companies and their personnel say no when they could so easily say yes, talk instead of listen, and defend instead of rectify. I try to treat each and every one of my customers, or prospective customers (which is everyone I ever meet), as someone whose needs I am happy to be able to fill. It makes me nuts when I am the customer, and I still find I am the one trying to make the transaction work to everyone’s satisfaction, rather than the other way around. This hotel obviously thought going through the motions was good enough.

  25. DannyBrown says:

    @caroljsroth Agreed. Better than any huge marketing budget that bypasses the little things. 🙂

  26. DannyBrown says:

    @caroljsroth Agreed. Better than any huge marketing budget that bypasses the little things. 🙂

  27. Shonali says:

    Along the lines of “valued guest,” one of the things that irritates me the most is when people, especially sales/customer service people, mispronounce my name. And I’m not even talking about my first name, since I get that that can be difficult. But how difficult is it to correctly pronounce – or spell – “Burke”?!

  28. Shonali says:

    Along the lines of “valued guest,” one of the things that irritates me the most is when people, especially sales/customer service people, mispronounce my name. And I’m not even talking about my first name, since I get that that can be difficult. But how difficult is it to correctly pronounce – or spell – “Burke”?!

  29. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    I’m sorry, but get over it. People are way too sensitive and have an unneccesary sense of self-importance. Should they have not written any letter at all–that is, would it make you feel less valued to see no effort or a half-attempt?

  30. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    I’m sorry, but get over it. People are way too sensitive and have an unneccesary sense of self-importance. Should they have not written any letter at all–that is, would it make you feel less valued to see no effort or a half-attempt?

  31. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    I’m sorry, but get over it. People are too sensitive and have an overwhelming sense of self-importance. Should they not have written the letter at all–that is, would you feel less valued to see no effort or a half-attempt? Personally, I don’t want the hotel refering how many times I ate somewhere or what I did; I’d feel that was an invasion of privacy. I don’t need a thank you for patronizing a business.

  32. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    I’m sorry, but get over it. People are too sensitive and have an overwhelming sense of self-importance. Should they not have written the letter at all–that is, would you feel less valued to see no effort or a half-attempt? Personally, I don’t want the hotel refering how many times I ate somewhere or what I did; I’d feel that was an invasion of privacy. I don’t need a thank you for patronizing a business.

  33. LouBortone says:

    Hi Katherine – I get what you’re saying and I’m not sure it’s a matter of being too sensitive. For me, the point is, if you are going to go to the trouble of engaging your customers or guests, why not go the extra step of making it personal? I think a little extra effort goes a long way. Just my two cents!

  34. LouBortone says:

    Hi Katherine – I get what you’re saying and I’m not sure it’s a matter of being too sensitive. For me, the point is, if you are going to go to the trouble of engaging your customers or guests, why not go the extra step of making it personal? I think a little extra effort goes a long way. Just my two cents!

  35. DannyBrown says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink So what you’re saying is you should be thankful for having a business to be a patron of? And that the business – any business – doesn’t need to make the effort to stand out?

    There are a ton of hotels that make an effort, and their sales figures reflect it. It’s not about being “sensitive”, it’s about seeing which business really cares about customers and which ones just count the beans.

  36. DannyBrown says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink So what you’re saying is you should be thankful for having a business to be a patron of? And that the business – any business – doesn’t need to make the effort to stand out?

    There are a ton of hotels that make an effort, and their sales figures reflect it. It’s not about being “sensitive”, it’s about seeing which business really cares about customers and which ones just count the beans.

  37. Shonali says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink Two things.

    First, this is not about being self-important; it’s about recognizing that good customer service is the smartest PR you can undertake. Not taking the time to address a visitor by name is not smart customer service.

    I don’t think the hotel needed to reference each and every thing a guest (in this case, Carol) did while staying there. They could, however, easily have personalized the name, even if it was a form letter. It’s not that tough to do.

    Second, it’s exactly this attention to detail that makes certain organizations in every niche stand out above the rest, as Danny points out. Those are the ones who end up doing better from a business point of view.

  38. Shonali says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink Two things.

    First, this is not about being self-important; it’s about recognizing that good customer service is the smartest PR you can undertake. Not taking the time to address a visitor by name is not smart customer service.

    I don’t think the hotel needed to reference each and every thing a guest (in this case, Carol) did while staying there. They could, however, easily have personalized the name, even if it was a form letter. It’s not that tough to do.

    Second, it’s exactly this attention to detail that makes certain organizations in every niche stand out above the rest, as Danny points out. Those are the ones who end up doing better from a business point of view.

  39. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    I understand what everyone is saying, except Danny Brown–I wasn’t saying I’m thankful for patronizing; I’m saying I don’t need a business to thank me.
    I just think this is a lot of fuss over a small thing. I agree that customer service is important, but, like I said, I would be a little creeped out if I found a letter in my room with my name on it. I guess I prefer to be an anonymous customer and don’t care if I’m just a number to most business, and I don’t get why other people want everything personalized.

  40. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    I understand what everyone is saying, except Danny Brown–I wasn’t saying I’m thankful for patronizing; I’m saying I don’t need a business to thank me.
    I just think this is a lot of fuss over a small thing. I agree that customer service is important, but, like I said, I would be a little creeped out if I found a letter in my room with my name on it. I guess I prefer to be an anonymous customer and don’t care if I’m just a number to most business, and I don’t get why other people want everything personalized.

  41. DannyBrown says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink Your quote was:

    ” I don’t need a thank you for patronizing a business.”

    I’d read that as a business wouldn’t be grateful for custom – more, they should just expect people to patron regardless of the experience and be done with it.

    When you get the bill at the end of your stay, does it have your name on it, or Dear Patron / Valued Customer?

    If you prefer to be Anonymous Customer, fair enough. I think you’ll find more people prefer to be Listened To Customer so businesses can really deliver the experience that builds their success and loyalty.

    And as a business owner, I build that type of relationship every time. Funnily enough, it works.

  42. DannyBrown says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink Your quote was:

    ” I don’t need a thank you for patronizing a business.”

    I’d read that as a business wouldn’t be grateful for custom – more, they should just expect people to patron regardless of the experience and be done with it.

    When you get the bill at the end of your stay, does it have your name on it, or Dear Patron / Valued Customer?

    If you prefer to be Anonymous Customer, fair enough. I think you’ll find more people prefer to be Listened To Customer so businesses can really deliver the experience that builds their success and loyalty.

    And as a business owner, I build that type of relationship every time. Funnily enough, it works.

  43. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    @DannyBrown I agree to an extent-I want my doctor and accountant to know my name, maybe even a local bar who makes my drink exactly the way I like it, but not necessarily some random hotel. I don’t think businesses have to get personal to deliver good customer service. I’m usually torn between finding very friendly employees endearing or annoying, but I appreciate the effort. But, yes, the bill should have my name on it. What kind of business do you run, out of curiosity?

  44. KatherineHeidtbrink says:

    @DannyBrown I agree to an extent-I want my doctor and accountant to know my name, maybe even a local bar who makes my drink exactly the way I like it, but not necessarily some random hotel. I don’t think businesses have to get personal to deliver good customer service. I’m usually torn between finding very friendly employees endearing or annoying, but I appreciate the effort. But, yes, the bill should have my name on it. What kind of business do you run, out of curiosity?

  45. caroljsroth says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink I don’t think this is a sense of self-importance issue. I think this is a difference between actions and words that gives me a really bad feeling for a brand, which could have engendered loyalty.
    They said I was valued, but did nothing to show that in a credible way. So yes, it would have been better for them to do nothing.

    Let’s face it, customers have more choices than we could ever want or need. If you want to engender loyalty, you want to make a customer feel special. This isn’t self-importance again, this is that I have a choice of where to spend my money, and I am going to value places that value me– really value me, not just type a generic “we value you, Ms. Random Customer”

  46. caroljsroth says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink I don’t think this is a sense of self-importance issue. I think this is a difference between actions and words that gives me a really bad feeling for a brand, which could have engendered loyalty.
    They said I was valued, but did nothing to show that in a credible way. So yes, it would have been better for them to do nothing.

    Let’s face it, customers have more choices than we could ever want or need. If you want to engender loyalty, you want to make a customer feel special. This isn’t self-importance again, this is that I have a choice of where to spend my money, and I am going to value places that value me– really value me, not just type a generic “we value you, Ms. Random Customer”

  47. AnnManion says:

    For me, there’s nothing sweeter than checking into a hotel and unexpectedly hearing a bellman or front desk associate discretely remark,

    “Welcome Back Ms. Manion, we’re happy to see you again “

  48. AnnManion says:

    For me, there’s nothing sweeter than checking into a hotel and unexpectedly hearing a bellman or front desk associate discretely remark,

    “Welcome Back Ms. Manion, we’re happy to see you again “

  49. AnnManion says:

    For me, there’s nothing sweeter than checking into a hotel and unexpectedly hearing a bellman or front desk associate discretely remark,

    “Welcome Back Ms. Manion, we’re happy to see you again “

  50. AnnManion says:

    For me, there’s nothing sweeter than checking into a hotel and unexpectedly hearing a bellman or front desk associate discretely remark,

    “Welcome Back Ms. Manion, we’re happy to see you again “

  51. JMattHicks says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink I think you may have lost the context behind the post. We are on a PR forum, not a hotel review website. This is about the RIGHT PR moves, and also about the bad ones. Not personalizing is never a good PR move. Is it necessarily bad? Well, not necessarily. But it is not a good PR move and those are fully immersed in the PR world, i.e. Gini Dietrich ,@dannybrown , and @caroljsroth , recognized that and blogged about it to inform.

    It has nothing to do with self-entitlement or blowing things out of proportion. It’s whether or not this hotel, or any other company, is willing to go the extra mile. But showing that you’re not, that’s bad PR and the motive (or lack thereof) behind the otherwise generous offer takes away from the impact of the offer.

  52. JMattHicks says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink I think you may have lost the context behind the post. We are on a PR forum, not a hotel review website. This is about the RIGHT PR moves, and also about the bad ones. Not personalizing is never a good PR move. Is it necessarily bad? Well, not necessarily. But it is not a good PR move and those are fully immersed in the PR world, i.e. Gini Dietrich ,@dannybrown , and @caroljsroth , recognized that and blogged about it to inform.

    It has nothing to do with self-entitlement or blowing things out of proportion. It’s whether or not this hotel, or any other company, is willing to go the extra mile. But showing that you’re not, that’s bad PR and the motive (or lack thereof) behind the otherwise generous offer takes away from the impact of the offer.

  53. fuckmyozone says:

    You people expect us to kiss your ass, well it isn’t going to happen! If you call me I’m not going to say how sorry I am for the inconvenience.. you called to get your problem solved. Do you want me to fix it? Or sit there and kiss your ass til your done complaining? Sorry (no pun intended) you can’t have both!

    As for the letter, be thankful you got one, if it were my choice you wouldn’t have received a letter at all you ungrateful fuck.

  54. fuckmyozone says:

    You people expect us to kiss your ass, well it isn’t going to happen! If you call me I’m not going to say how sorry I am for the inconvenience.. you called to get your problem solved. Do you want me to fix it? Or sit there and kiss your ass til your done complaining? Sorry (no pun intended) you can’t have both!

    As for the letter, be thankful you got one, if it were my choice you wouldn’t have received a letter at all you ungrateful fuck.

  55. DannyBrown says:

    @fuckmyozone Hi Mr Zone. (0r is it Irish, and should be pronounced Mr. O’Zone?)

    I recall calling you once, and you didn’t seem like the angry person you are here. I can only imagine it’s to do with people pronouncing your name wrong – is it Fuck My or Fuck Me? That would confuse the heck out of me, and I have an easy name (although you’d be surprised at how many people get it mixed up with Bruin).

    Anyhoo… When we spoke, you mentioned that I should check my vacuum cleaner filter, as it might not work properly because it’s clogged up. I was extremely grateful for this advice, as it meant I didn’t have to make my arthritic grandma sweep up. (By the way, she wanted me to say “Hello” to that nice Mister Fucker).

    So I’m curious what turned you from the nice helpful man that made me and my grandma’s life easier, to the angry gangster-headwear-wearing chap on this nice post by Ms. Roth?

    It can’t be her picture, as she looks as friendly as you were when sorting out my vacuum cleaner. Besides, she looks how my grandma did when she was in her late twenties, and I know you can’t be on about my grandma.

    Is it because she’s in a suit? I know that some older generation Irish (along with my kinsfolk, the Scots) have a problem with women in suits, and what possible good they would be in the kitchen. But look at it this way – you can wear it when you’re being helpful on the phone, and I know my grandma will smile as she thinks of you all smart and dapper and talking about vacuum cleaners.

    Anyhoo… I may have drifted off topic a little here. I just wanted to show the folks on this comment thread that you’re not the foul-mouthed dickwad that your comment makes you out to be, but rarther a nice young man that helps grandmas avoid sweeping floors. In my opinion, not enough people (especially grandmas) are thankful for the job you do.

    Have a wonderful Christmas in Dublin, Mr O’Zone! 🙂

  56. DannyBrown says:

    @fuckmyozone Hi Mr Zone. (0r is it Irish, and should be pronounced Mr. O’Zone?)

    I recall calling you once, and you didn’t seem like the angry person you are here. I can only imagine it’s to do with people pronouncing your name wrong – is it Fuck My or Fuck Me? That would confuse the heck out of me, and I have an easy name (although you’d be surprised at how many people get it mixed up with Bruin).

    Anyhoo… When we spoke, you mentioned that I should check my vacuum cleaner filter, as it might not work properly because it’s clogged up. I was extremely grateful for this advice, as it meant I didn’t have to make my arthritic grandma sweep up. (By the way, she wanted me to say “Hello” to that nice Mister Fucker).

    So I’m curious what turned you from the nice helpful man that made me and my grandma’s life easier, to the angry gangster-headwear-wearing chap on this nice post by Ms. Roth?

    It can’t be her picture, as she looks as friendly as you were when sorting out my vacuum cleaner. Besides, she looks how my grandma did when she was in her late twenties, and I know you can’t be on about my grandma.

    Is it because she’s in a suit? I know that some older generation Irish (along with my kinsfolk, the Scots) have a problem with women in suits, and what possible good they would be in the kitchen. But look at it this way – you can wear it when you’re being helpful on the phone, and I know my grandma will smile as she thinks of you all smart and dapper and talking about vacuum cleaners.

    Anyhoo… I may have drifted off topic a little here. I just wanted to show the folks on this comment thread that you’re not the foul-mouthed dickwad that your comment makes you out to be, but rarther a nice young man that helps grandmas avoid sweeping floors. In my opinion, not enough people (especially grandmas) are thankful for the job you do.

    Have a wonderful Christmas in Dublin, Mr O’Zone! 🙂

  57. caroljsroth says:

    @fuckmyozone Mr Zone
    While I am guessing you are not a representative of the hotel I stayed at, I think you are missing the point. This hotel was in Las Vegas, where I had dozens upon dozens of choices, all with various discounts, service levels and offerings. They had an opportunity to create loyalty and didn’t.

    There’s this concept called supply and demand, and in today’s environment of oversupply, the customer has the power. That doesn’t make me ungrateful- it’s just economics.

    And I wish that the letter had been addressed “Dear Ungrateful Fuck”- then at least I would have laughed.

  58. caroljsroth says:

    @fuckmyozone Mr Zone
    While I am guessing you are not a representative of the hotel I stayed at, I think you are missing the point. This hotel was in Las Vegas, where I had dozens upon dozens of choices, all with various discounts, service levels and offerings. They had an opportunity to create loyalty and didn’t.

    There’s this concept called supply and demand, and in today’s environment of oversupply, the customer has the power. That doesn’t make me ungrateful- it’s just economics.

    And I wish that the letter had been addressed “Dear Ungrateful Fuck”- then at least I would have laughed.

  59. MegaByteMe says:

    @fuckmyozone Hey, don’t sugar-coat it…tell us how you REALLY feel…smhucks like you make me wonder why people frequent places that hire people of such small-minded retorts as yours.

    She was talking about PERSONAL SERVICE, which is something you are sadly lacking in. If you were my employee, and I thank the stars you’re not, and therefore not representing my business, you would find a version of that letter in your final paycheck, but not nearly as flowery. Your reply just shows how much of a double-digit, lower-spectrum intelligence quotient that is hopefully going to be addressed by Nature, and breeded out of the gene pool.

    Please notice that at no time did I degrade myself into the gutter-speak that you seem to employ, yet make my point abundantly clear. If you have problems with some of those bigger words, I suggest using a dictionary.

    Just goes to show that not everyone is as ignorant, nor misinformed as your unworthy self.

    Please take time to read the total post, otherwise it makes you look foolish, but hey, you seem to be doing allright by yourself…

  60. MegaByteMe says:

    @KatherineHeidtbrink Statistics are a fact of life.Get over it. You are one yourself. I put you in the’Big Brother Bugger orf’ section.

    Just cos you don’t like it, don’t mean it’s gonna go away.

    One day I hope to disappear, and wreak havok….wonderful times had by all

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