Arment Dietrich

Breast Cancer Mystery Messages

By: Arment Dietrich | October 14, 2010 | 
9

How many of you received a message through Facebook asking you to post where you like to keep your purse as a status update to help raise awareness of breast cancer?  How many of you made the status post?

Men, were you wondering what was going on on Facebook when you saw updates such as “I like it on the kitchen table?”

Last year to raise awareness of breast cancer, women were asked to post the color of their bra, ultimately getting their friends to ask them what it was all about.  It turned out to be a big success as women around the world were posting colors for more than a week.  But to repeat the campaign not even 12 months later, you have to ask, what is this doing?

Similar to my last post a few weeks ago on the I Love Boobies campaign, asking women to put sayings such as “I like it on the floor” gives sexual meaning to anyone not in the loop on the mystery message.  The issue I am having is that yes, the first time around it was cute and did spark awareness for some new Facebookers, but I can’t image this copycat campaign reached more than the original.  So the question is, isn’t it about time to make change and start asking for donations?  Or if you start asking for donations, does your engagement go down?

  • Cherri

    Well, I saw far fewer posts this time around on my fb page than I did last time, so I think it is already running out of steam. But I have questions…. Who started this – does anyone really know? (If so, I haven’ run across those articls yet.) Also, what impact did it really have? Check out this article – I share many of he cncerns mentioned.

    http://blog.washingtonpost.com/story-lab/2010/01/solving_the_bra_color_facebook.html

  • Cherri

    Well, I saw far fewer posts this time around on my fb page than I did last time, so I think it is already running out of steam. But I have questions…. Who started this – does anyone really know? (If so, I haven’t run across those articles yet.) Also, what impact did it really have? Check out this article – I share many of the same concerns mentioned.

    http://www.newsweek.com/blogs/the-human-condition/2010/01/08/what-color-is-your-bra-facebook-s-pointless-underwear-protest.html

  • While I can see the motives behind such campaigns, I don’t know too many people who suddenly become more aware of breast cancer through these campaigns. A more effective campaign would be definitely be more straightforward and true to the cause.

  • MolliMegasko

    Cherri, I love that article. While I don’t agree the first campaign was pointless, I do think they should step the next one up a notch. What we don’t know is who is behind the purse campaign. It might just be an avid person who sparked another viral campaign. If that is the case, would we then consider it a success?

  • mikecassidyAZ

    I appreciate the viral attributes of what I have come to refer to as “Octoberbreast” every year. Focused events, suggestively focused postings all lead to awareness. The key is to have clear, simple opt-in action/giving related to the activity — a link or text option to “I love boobies” resulting in a $10 donation would provide the measurable metrics to see if edgy tactics are viable.

  • Cherri

    @ Molli – If it was just a zealous individual who started the campaign, then – yes – I think they probably would/could consider it a success. But if it was XYZ Breast Cancer Awareness Organization, then I don’t think so.

    @ Mike – I totally agree. Without some measurable call to action it’s impossible to tell if these tactics are viable.

  • StacyNelson

    See here’s the thing – I didn’t even know that the bra game was supposed to be for Breast Cancer awareness last year so I’m really not sure that playing along was all that effective. I see everyday people getting sucked into pink mania each October so I always ask a couple of basic questions before I buy – how much actually goes towards Breast Cancer and which organization does it support? I go an additional step and check out http://www.charitynavigator.org for a report card on the non-profit benefiting from my money. Some aren’t worth a penny.

    Think before you Pink and yes – find a great organization and ask for actual donations (local ones doing actual field work are the best)… Your engagement might not have as many questions as saying ‘I like it on the floor’ but the impression people will have of you as a good person will go up, and isn’t that the best way to network?

  • Pingback: Does Awareness Count As Marketing Results? | Spin Sucks()

  • TweetsbyKnorr

    Isn’t a part of the awareness campaign to tell the listener exactly what it is you want them to do in a clear supportive way/ For example, Tell Us Where You Like to Keep Your Purse — click here to share and to donate to XYZ…”

    Actually next year when raising my $$ for the Komen Walks — I am going to try that idea I like it so much! Thanks for sparking the idea. I would love to hear other ideas on what you think will spark engagement to a cause with a clear branded fun idea that leads to a request for a donation.

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