Guest

Five Reasons You Should Discuss Pricing on Your Website

By: Guest | August 17, 2011 | 
146

Today’s guest post is written by Marcus Sheridan.

Some scientists claim the phenomenon of Stonehenge is the greatest mystery the world has ever seen. Others argue the case of crop circles, the Lost City of Atlantis, or even the location of the Ark of the Covenant.

But when it comes down to it, none of these even come close to the great mystery that is alive and well on hundreds of thousands of business websites across the world today—the absence of pricing information.

You might think I’m kidding when I make these comparisons, but I’m not. For me, the idea that so many businesses, small and large, are afraid to discuss pricing on their website simply makes me slap my forehead and wonder if I’m participating in a live episode of The Twilight Zone.

I know some of you reading this are shaking your head as you don’t feel such a discussion on your website is possible. But let me assure you that if you’ll just open yourself up to the possibilities, your company’s website and marketing efforts may just take an upward swing you never dreamed possible.

Five Reasons to Discuss Pricing on Your Website

1. SEO Value. Here’s the deal—Most industries and businesses are afraid to talk about pricing on their websites. Notwithstanding, this is one of the most common search phrases Google gets when folks are serious about buying a product. That said, you have a great opportunity to show up on the first page of Google search results if you’re simply willing to address the question of how much your product or service costs.

As an example, let’s take a look at my swimming pool website (Yes, when I’m not writing about marketing I’m overseeing my swimming pool company). Because no one in the industry talked about fiberglass swimming pools for years on their website, we decided to answer every question our customers had ever asked us. Considering pricing and cost is the number one question we get from consumers, we wrote various articles on the subject. And the results? In the past three years, just because we address this important question, our site has received an additional:

  • 220,000 page views
  • 55,000 visitors
  • 138 leads
  • Roughly $1,000,000 in sales

Keep in mind these stats are just based on pricing/cost related keywords in organic search, and as you can see, they’ve been a literal jackpot and have led to a mountain of additional sales. If you’d like to see what I’m talking about here, just type in Google ‘Fiberglass Pool Cost’ or ‘Fiberglass Pool Pricing’.

2. You’re going to have to answer the question anyway. The main reason business owners tell me they can’t talk about pricing on their website is because there is too much of a range to deal with, and thus it’s impossible to give someone realistic expectations. But my response to this is simple: “When someone calls you on the phone and asks you for a price range, do you refuse to answer them or do you ask a few questions and attempt to give basic numbers?”

Again, let’s look at swimming pools as an example. My product ranges from $20,000 to $200,000, but this doesn’t mean I can’t give a potential client at least a broad expectation based on their wants and needs. (Again, if you haven’t looked at my pricing page, you should do this.)

When it comes to content marketing, folks, there is simply no excuse not to address any and every potential question a consumer may ask. It’s that simple.

3. Qualify better and stop wasting your time. Have you ever had a sales appointment that was an absolute waste of time because you were way out of the shopper’s budget? Well, if you did, it’s your fault. Why? Because you didn’t prepare the prospect. You weren’t honest and forthright. And in this day and age of poor credit and hard-to-come-by financing, you sure as heck need to filter out the qualified from the unqualified consumers.

4. Your stuff is worth it. Let me be blunt with this one: If you’re embarrassed by your pricing, why in the world would anyone have the confidence to buy from you? Pricing and cost should never be a subject of trepidation when dealing with prospects. In fact, talking about pricing should be as natural as talking about any other aspect of the product or service. Seriously, there should be no difference in approach.

5. Prospects will love you and you’ll stand out from the crowd. If I had a dollar for every time someone told me, “Marcus, thank you so much for talking about pricing on your website. I couldn’t seem to find answers anywhere!”, I’d be a millionaire. Today’s consumer appreciates openness, honesty, and transparency—so why not embrace such a mentality??

So there you have it folks, five reasons you should be discussing price on your company website right now. And if you don’t believe that it will work, I can only ask that you give it a try. Look for reasons that it will work versus conjuring up all the ways in which it won’t.

I could go on and on regarding this subject but I’ve already badly broken the Spin Sucks word count rules 😉 Plus, I’m saving it for my webinar next week with Gini Dietrich. If you haven’t signed up for ‘Content’s Ability to Close Sales’, you really should strongly consider it, because it’s going to be awesome and regret is not fun. It is Thursday, August 25th, 11 am Central, $50, and you can register here.

So now it’s your turn. Do you think pricing should be discussed on a company’s website? What’s your business’ approach to this subject and what have been the results?

Marcus Sheridan has won the heart of Gini Dietrich and millions of others with his rockin words on business, marketing, blogging, and life success principles. And don’t forget to subscribe to his blog or connect with him on G+.

Note from Gini: He’s right; he has won my heart. He’s really freaking smart and has a TON of value to provide PR and marketing professionals.

  • StephenSmith

    You’re echoing the question I’ve found myself asking time & time again!

    Glad being upfront works for you… now if only the rest of the world would listen.

    Nicely written.

  • StephenSmith

    You’re echoing the question I’ve found myself asking time & time again!

    Glad being upfront works for you… now if only the rest of the world would listen.

    Nicely written.

  • thehotiron

    Great post Marcus! As a Web consultant, I have always pondered putting pricing information on my site, but as a Web site has many options and directions… like a swimming pool I have learned … I didn’t know how to approach it. I could almost take the beginning of your pricing page and swap “swimming pool” for “Web site” and it would work! Of course I won’t do that. 🙂

    mp/m

  • @StephenSmith Thanks Stephen, it’s really common sense, isn’t it? I think we’re now in the ‘Age of Upfrontness’ (great word, ehh?), and those that don’t take this approach will quickly lose the trust of the public. BTW Stephen, do you talk about pricing on your site and what have been the results?

  • @thehotiron Hahaha, I wouldn’t mind it actually. I think my pricing page has been literally copied to some extent about 200 times by this point in the pool industry. And since I’ve now been involved in teaching this to businesses for the last year, it’s only gotten worse. 😉 So copy away brother!!!

  • StephenSmith

    @Marcus_Sheridan I like the ‘Age of Upfrontness’

    I don’t have a site to discus prices on, but if I did, I would.

  • A successful business owner offered us this advice: Price according to what the market will bear, and then deliver the best service and value for that price. If a potential client thinks you’re too expensive, then he’s not your client. He’s someone else’s client. Let him go.Another successful business owner told us his company won’t even touch a project with a budget of under $25k. Again, if a potential customer thinks that’s too expensive, so be it. That’s someone else’s client. Let them go. We have to get over the fear of losing customers to businesses who undercut the market. It’s OK. If you’re Texas Roadhouse, you don’t lower your prices to attract the McDonald’s customer.

  • @thehotiron We posted an “entry level” price for our WordPress websites, and spelled out very carefully what that price includes. That way, the entry level customer knows what to expect, and the customer who has a larger budget knows he can afford us — and still get great value and service. It works for us!

  • @StephenSmith Nice…well if I write the book on it, we’ll split the royalties 😉

  • NEMultimedia

    Excellent, challenging post. RT @ginidietrich Five Reasons to have pricing on your website by @thesaleslion http://t.co/hBbDYn3

  • NEMultimedia

    Excellent, challenging post. RT @ginidietrich Five Reasons to have pricing on your website by @thesaleslion http://t.co/hBbDYn3

  • @NEMultimedia Michelle, awesome. Completely down with your way of thinking here. The core of this principle of openess in pricing centers around those 3 magic words you mentioned here:

    Let them go

    If a business doesn’t know who to let go, they’re in big trouble. I mean BIG trouble. Discussing pricing, in the proper manner of course, is one of the best sales filters ever created…and boy does it save a lot of wasted time and conversation.

    Thanks Michelle!!!

  • @NEMultimedia Michelle, awesome. Completely down with your way of thinking here. The core of this principle of openess in pricing centers around those 3 magic words you mentioned here:

    Let them go

    If a business doesn’t know who to let go, they’re in big trouble. I mean BIG trouble. Discussing pricing, in the proper manner of course, is one of the best sales filters ever created…and boy does it save a lot of wasted time and conversation.

    Thanks Michelle!!!

  • @NEMultimedia Michelle, awesome. Completely down with your way of thinking here. The core of this principle of openess in pricing centers around those 3 magic words you mentioned here:

    Let them go

    If a business doesn’t know who to let go, they’re in big trouble. I mean BIG trouble. Discussing pricing, in the proper manner of course, is one of the best sales filters ever created…and boy does it save a lot of wasted time and conversation.

    Thanks Michelle!!!

  • I am so shy about asking for money. I need to get over that. Recently, I was contacted for some ideas about how to help a very small local business get his blog back up and running. I gave him some ideas, and he is off to the races.

    What I need is a way to realize getting paid for that kind of thing is not selfish, evil or bad. It is how I need to start making a living. I am glad I saw this post Marcus. I am bookmarking this one.

  • @NEMultimedia@thehotiron Love the process of ‘spelling out’, as it allows for no confusion. And this ‘no confusion’ isn’t just going to happen before the sale, but it’s also a huge benefit after the product or service is delivered, because now the customer can’t say, “But you promised you’d include….” or ‘But I thought I’d also get…..”

  • @NEMultimedia@thehotiron Love the process of ‘spelling out’, as it allows for no confusion. And this ‘no confusion’ isn’t just going to happen before the sale, but it’s also a huge benefit after the product or service is delivered, because now the customer can’t say, “But you promised you’d include….” or ‘But I thought I’d also get…..”

  • @NEMultimedia@thehotiron Love the process of ‘spelling out’, as it allows for no confusion. And this ‘no confusion’ isn’t just going to happen before the sale, but it’s also a huge benefit after the product or service is delivered, because now the customer can’t say, “But you promised you’d include….” or ‘But I thought I’d also get…..”

  • And this is why I am adding a pricing page on the site. Thanks Buddy.

  • @NancyD68 Talking about pricing is a beautiful thing Nancy. I love discussing the subject personally. It should never be treated as a great mystery or anything of that nature. You bring value. You’re great at what you do. You make people money…..and for that you should get paid.

    I’ll be calling you soon Nancy btw, got your message. 🙂

  • @John Falchetto Sweet JF, awesome brother. In fact, I’m thinking “How much does a Life Coach typically cost” would be one heck of a keyword phrase to capture….Hmmmm, dude, now that I think about it, we should have tackled that one a while ago, as well as a bunch others that are rolling around in my head right now. Let’s make sure to skype today and discuss. Once comments slow down here a bit, let’s chat, like around 2:30 eastern or so. Cool?

  • @Marcus_Sheridan Looking forward to it.

  • @Marcus_Sheridan I have my phone near me!

  • thehotiron

    @visiblelogic I like his approach, and it’s somewhat similar to what we do, by giving ranges

  • @NancyD68@Marcus_Sheridan It’s definitely something you need to get over but I think we all go through it at the beginning. We all want to be helpful, but we also need to eat, right? !!

    Having a nice detailed explanation of what someone can expect in terms of pricing is such a great way to qualify your prospects!

    I knew I made it over that money hump the day someone asked my hourly rate and he was shocked, and appalled, and I stared back at him, straight-faced. He is not my customer and that is absolutely fine. If I had had it on my website, I wouldn’t have even been in the meeting to begin with. That was at least an hour I could have actually been EARNING my hourly rate!!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan@StephenSmith If?

  • @Lisa Gerber@NancyD68 Amen to that Lisa. Great example.

  • Glenn Street

    Marcus, just what I needed. Audiologists (my wife is one) seem to have an ingrained fear of talking about price – usually in the 4 to 6 grand range – until a patient is sitting in front of them. They feel they can convince someone of their value, but only in person. Problem is they are, by and large, lousy salespeople.

    For years have suggested being open with hearing aid pricing would actually make their job easier, for the reasons you listed (it’s by far the #1 request by patients…. what a shock). Audiologists don’t believe me, but hopefully they will believe you. Thanks.

  • @Lisa Gerber@StephenSmith Well, the problem is I have a few other things to write first, like ginidietrich ‘s biography “How to Ride Bikes with the Big Boys and kick their @#$%@#$%#” 🙂

  • @Glenn Street Another perfect example of an entire industry living in the stone ages Glen. Crazy, but that’s how it works. Your wife could own that industry in no time if she broke through this stupid ‘code of silence’ and really started answering questions just as she would sitting down with a customer. In fact, if I was her, I’d do a sit down video of her explaining pricing, not just the written explanation. This way, she’s able to deliver the emotional appeal she’s so afraid to lose by addressing it beforehand.

    Good luck Glen, would love to hear from you as to how it goes!

    Marcus

  • I think it depends on the industry, mate.

    We offer a host of different services that have various prices:

    – Audits (price based on industry, demographics, depth and time needed for research and analysis/recommendations)

    – Integrated marketing campaigns (price based on per project needs, tools needed, manpower)

    – Web design (price based on depth, e-commerce needs, social integration, cross branding)

    These are just three of our most recent projects, and each one was different. For a marketing agency,or similar, I don’t think you can be as clear cut on the price, as there’s no “standard project”.

    Cheers, mate! 🙂

  • @Lisa Gerber@Marcus_Sheridan Well said. that is exactly what I have to work on. I also have to as your said be helpful, but still eat 🙂

    That balance is where I need help. I had a phone call with someone who clearly could not afford my help – and like you said Lisa – he is not my customer. I need to get to that point in the conversation faster.

    Really good example and this is why i come and comment. This is how I learn.

  • Glenn Street

    @Marcus_Sheridan Stone age indeed but fortunately, Barb does not have feet of rock. She recently opened a new practice (her third) and agreed to try my “crazy” pricing scheme. Since then, we’ve had inquiries from people on four continents asking where they can find a local office that does what Barb does. It seems we struck a nerve. New patients take to the program immediately, but with prior hearing aid users, it takes a while to “unstick” them from the pricing assumptions they have seen for years (and hate).

    Interestingly, comments from fellow professional have fallen into only two extremes. It’s either “Tell me more”, or “You’re going to destroy our industry!” Not sure we have the power to do the latter, but it sure would be fun if we did!

    Your video idea is good, particularly since Barb is the type of person patients want to adopt and take home with them after spending only 5 minutes with her. But she’s really camera shy. Will have to figure out how to relax her enough for her personality to come through. Can see how video would be more powerful than a price list (no matter how well done) for fields that are traditionally one-on-one, private affairs like audiology.

  • @DannyBrown What about if you gave estimates like “we charge $$$ per hour and an average audit is anywhere from XX to XX amount of hours.” It will give people a ballpark at least of what to expect.

  • @DannyBrown What about if you gave estimates like “we charge $$$ per hour and an average audit is anywhere from XX to XX amount of hours.” It will give people a ballpark at least of what to expect.

  • @DannyBrown What about if you gave estimates like “we charge $$$ per hour and an average audit is anywhere from XX to XX amount of hours.” It will give people a ballpark at least of what to expect.

  • @DannyBrown What about if you gave estimates like “we charge $$$ per hour and an average audit is anywhere from XX to XX amount of hours.” It will give people a ballpark at least of what to expect.

  • I’d say the reason people leave off the pricing is they assume they’ll scare everyone off before their sales team can get the chance to schmooze with the prospective client. But if you’re like me, you don’t even bother with the services that don’t have some pricing mentioned because you just assume, as a prospective client, you couldn’t afford them anyway and move on. Great points! I’d definitely rather have less inquiries, but have the ones that do know what they’re asking for and know it’s what they want already.

  • @DannyBrown I agree with Danny, and it’s why I don’t put prices on my site either.

    I’ve noticed that people want to know about price because it’s one of the few things they know to compare different providers or products. But with a service, it’s easy to mistake two providers as being the same except for the price, when the service itself can vary significantly.

    Hope that made sense!

  • Glenn Street

    @DannyBrown Perhaps we’re asking the wrong question. Instead of “I can’t publish a price list because my price structure is complex”, how about asking the question, “How can I ballpark this to attract the clients I want?”

  • @DannyBrown I agree, Danny! For us, everything we do is totally custom. So while we could say our range is say $5k-$100k, it is just to broad and would probably scare people away. Even if someone comes saying I want you to make my site like site X, there are still too many variables. Like you mentioned, depth, e-commerce, CMS, etc. Not to mention phased development. Some clients get the full price then want to break it into phases for cost purposes….well somethings have to be done in specific order.

    Have we wasted time when being out of range, sure…who hasnt. But we will give a ball-park on the phone after a few specific questions. But, each call is totally different and many times our price isnt determined just by hourly rate (depending on programming language, etc.)

  • HowieSPM

    I use Google Shopping all the time to compare prices. Sadly so many ‘prices’ are negotiable. I agree with you points Marcus.Anyone who doesn’t list a price for that item never get’s a shot at my business. Every business with standard pricing should put it out there. Isn’t it cheaper than me calling and using a reps time and then say ‘sorry price is to high see you’

    I see there is that 380sq ft pool on your website for only 18.99 is that right? Clicking ‘Check out’ now

  • @Kristi Hines Hi Kristi,

    We don’t offer per hour services anymore, as we found that it often devalued the work we were doing, and limiting the services clients were getting (as they got into the mindset of trying to work out how many hours work they wanted).

    A monthly retainer is a better solution for everyone, but again this goes on a per project need. We’ve also seen audits take up to 6 months for a heavily bound-by-legal industry, and many clients outside that requirement could baulk at the cost involved, when their audit is nothing like that.

  • @Glenn Street That’s one option, Glenn, but often clients won’t understand what they need until they’ve really sat down and discussed the results they want, the comparative companies they want to emulate (very often not feasible), and their ideal scenario based on limitless budget.

    Then we reel them back into a more realistic tiered approach, and start looking at projects and costs from there.

    If you ballpark and then the project is way above scope of that, the client will be put off from the start. I’d rather make sure they’re fully understanding of the work that will be needed, and what that will entail, and then move forward from there.

  • @NathLussier Makes perfect sense!

    I’ve seen people say, “Well, so and so can offer us this for this price”, to which my response is, “Cool. You know what we bring to the table; you know the expertise; you know we partner throughout; you know we build in a pay-by-performance option. But if you prefer cost comparisons, then I won’t stop you.”

    You’re not comparing the price of beans in a supermarket; you’re comparing quality experience and results, and advice that’s right for your company. That’s worth more than trying to win by a few dollars an hour.

  • @sydcon_mktg Exactly – there’s much more to a great website than its coding. And the expertise that you guys bring in recommending platforms, designs, cross-platform branding, CMS, etc, is what separates you and makes it counter-productive to say you can get X site for Y dollars.

    There are definitely a lot of industries where a flat fee or hourly rate is feasible and worth showing; just as there are many where it’s less helpful and doesn’t benefit anyone.

    Cheers!

  • @DannyBrown@Glenn Street Amen! How many times have we had to real someone in! The folks who, God Bless them want all the bells and whistles for a small flat fee. We like to say our ballparks are “very loose estimates” meaning what the potential client might thinks is a small change of scope could easily double the estimate!

  • @DannyBrown@Glenn Street Amen! How many times have we had to real someone in! The folks who, God Bless them want all the bells and whistles for a small flat fee. We like to say our ballparks are “very loose estimates” meaning what the potential client might thinks is a small change of scope could easily double the estimate!

  • ginidietrich

    Did everyone like the note from me the best?!? I’m actually going to go down to the comments below and comment there. See you soon!

  • @HowieSPM Actually Howie, that 18.99 pool is on sale today, and today only, for all aliens……for 18.98 🙂

    Thanks for stopping by bro.

  • ginidietrich

    @Kristi Hines@DannyBrown@NathLussier I really fought the idea of this one. We still don’t have a pricing page, but I’m going to add one. And it’s not going to say how much we charge for things. It’s going to say what our minimums are. That way, people know what to expect when they call us. And they’re not going to call if they can’t meet our minimums.

    Like Danny, so much depends on the industry, geography, and product/service. But we also have things that cost the same no matter what (audit, research, marketing plan, etc.). Where we get into the variables is in the tactics.

  • @Kristi Hines So glad you’ve brought this up Kristi. The old-school technique of ‘schmoozing’ has now become the biggest turn-off ever to most consumers, and they see right through that junk. In fact, I think we’re now all born with ‘schmooz-o-meters’….either that or we buy the app. 😉

  • @Kristi Hines So glad you’ve brought this up Kristi. The old-school technique of ‘schmoozing’ has now become the biggest turn-off ever to most consumers, and they see right through that junk. In fact, I think we’re now all born with ‘schmooz-o-meters’….either that or we buy the app. 😉

  • @DannyBrown Ah, gotcha. While I like the security of a retainer, I know that a lot more people are attracted to the non-committal hourly rate as well. I aim for different clients though. 🙂

  • @DannyBrown Completely disagree with you 100% Danny. 🙂 There are no exceptions to the way consumers think. They have questions. We give answers. Do you have any idea how much money the guy makes that owns the #1 spot in Google for the phrase ‘How much does web design cost?’ —-Let me assure you, that guy is crushin it. Now does he need to put actual prices? No, of course not, but ranges? Yes. But more importantly, to make Google happy, he has to first address the question exists.

    Love ya buddy. 😉

  • @DannyBrown Completely disagree with you 100% Danny. 🙂 There are no exceptions to the way consumers think. They have questions. We give answers. Do you have any idea how much money the guy makes that owns the #1 spot in Google for the phrase ‘How much does web design cost?’ —-Let me assure you, that guy is crushin it. Now does he need to put actual prices? No, of course not, but ranges? Yes. But more importantly, to make Google happy, he has to first address the question exists.

    Love ya buddy. 😉

  • @Kristi Hines@DannyBrown It’s really not about retainers nor hourly rates. Danny, you can have a very effective cost page and actually not mention a single price on the menu. Seriously. If you explain in a cost page that clients spend 2k-200k, and then list the hundreds of reasons why costs vary, then you’ve done a pretty dang good job at least addressing the question, and preparing customers in the process.

  • @Marcus_Sheridan@Kristi Hines@DannyBrown Thats a good alternative suggestion, Marcus! Thanks!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan@Kristi Hines@DannyBrown Thats a good alternative suggestion, Marcus! Thanks!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan@Kristi Hines@DannyBrown Thats a good alternative suggestion, Marcus! Thanks!

  • @ginidietrich@Kristi Hines@DannyBrown@NathLussier But there is also so much more that could be on such a pricing page for you Gini. What are all the services involved? Which ones drive cost up the most? What are some of the most basic services for those on a tighter budget. Where do the majority of your customers end up when all is said and done? Seriously, the list goes on and on.

  • @NathLussier I completely understand where you’re coming from, but the issue boils down to this: What do you say when they call? Obviously you don’t give a full blown explanation and quote the first time on the phone, right? But you give the basics. Why not do the same on your site?

  • @NathLussier I completely understand where you’re coming from, but the issue boils down to this: What do you say when they call? Obviously you don’t give a full blown explanation and quote the first time on the phone, right? But you give the basics. Why not do the same on your site?

  • @NathLussier I completely understand where you’re coming from, but the issue boils down to this: What do you say when they call? Obviously you don’t give a full blown explanation and quote the first time on the phone, right? But you give the basics. Why not do the same on your site?

  • @Glenn Street Love your approach Glenn.

  • @sydcon_mktg Your scenario here, at least in my opinion, is the whole reason why a discussion of pricing on a website ‘should’ be done. Why can’t you properly write a pricing page that resolves false expectations? If someone reads something, and then don’t understand, then your copy needs to be clearer. But again, you’re going to have the conversation with them at some point, why not allow your website to be the source of great teaching, explanation, etc? And why not garner more traffic because of the SEO? And why not stand out from your competitors?

  • @Glenn Street So glad you like the suggestions Glenn,and a huge congrats to your successes as well. One way you could overcome your wife’s feelings about talking on video is to simply record her explaining pricing to a customer. That way she’s in her element. Just a thought.

  • Really got me thinking Marcus. Great topic and wonderful comments from everyone.

    Don’t think i’m ready for pricing on the site, yet, but will be soon. maybe after 6 months, do some research and studies (talk to you, of course, Ha !) and get some pricing on the site. Hummmmmmm ?

    Thanks for this and all the ways you CARE !

    Al

  • @Al Smith Totally understand man. Right now, because I’ve just started doing a lot more speaking, consulting, etc—I’m working on an updated pricing page. But as you know, TSL has been around for a long dang time.

    Thanks a ton bud!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan OK, Marcus, I’ll admit, ginidietrich is right…you know your stuff. You have definitely set the wheels churning here. I guess our reluctance all these years has steamed from too many factors going into our price point leading potential clients to be confused & turned off without the option to have a discussion and explain on their terms.

  • @Marcus_Sheridan OK, Marcus, I’ll admit, ginidietrich is right…you know your stuff. You have definitely set the wheels churning here. I guess our reluctance all these years has steamed from too many factors going into our price point leading potential clients to be confused & turned off without the option to have a discussion and explain on their terms.

  • @sydcon_mktgginidietrich Great stuff. Completely understand. But like I said in the article, just give it a try. The numbers don’t lie, and the change in quality of prospect will be worth its weight in gold. And if you’d like, work up a pricing page and then send it to me. I’ll look at it and give you some feedback. Would love to help you get the ball rolling. Good luck!!!!!!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan The problem with that, mate (and we’ve run into it before) is that clients (potential or existing) look at the lower end rate and expect the high-end product.

    It then leads to a ton of questions that just end up with everyone going in circles, and then we don’t really get to what’s best for the client.

    I can see why you and others are fans, but for us it’s working well without, and lets us concentrate on discussions with the client on their needs as opposed to their preconceptions of what they can afford. 🙂

  • @Marcus_Sheridanginidietrich Thanks for the offer, Marcus…dont be surprised if we take you up on it!

  • TheSalesLion

    @neicolec Thanks Neicole, so glad you got a little something from it!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan@NathLussier We don’t get into pricing on the call. We get into project needs; scale (both time and growth); goals; etc. We’ll then build from there and present.

    Take it another way – the basics don’t tell you other areas that you want to look at, as opposed to the one you came to us with. Your goals tell us that, and we’ve often diverted clients to a new project, based on needs as opposed to what they thought they wanted, and it’s saved money.

    So, again, for us, it’s not as clear cut as Dollar Amount X for Service Y.

  • franswaa

    Packaging/bundling things into offerings that have a price tag put on them publicly is a GREAT way to market online … it’s something that we’re starting to do where I work because all the benefits (i.e. things listed in this blog post).

    Funny thing is that actually “doing” it has been a HUGE challenge because it’s not traditionally how things have been done. Most were very scared/worried to pull the trigger.

    Here’s to being more transparent.

  • @Marcus_Sheridan And that’s great for him, mate.

    We prefer a different approach. 🙂

  • @Marcus_Sheridan And that’s great for him, mate.

    We prefer a different approach. 🙂

  • @franswaa “Here’s to being transparent’…..Ahhhh, I just love that phrase. And hey, if the politicians in Washington can’t do it, then we can certainly pick up their slack. 😉

  • @DannyBrown Bottom line, you’re making sales and money DB. You’ve got a system that works, so keep on rockin bud.

  • BobReed

    Customization is the crux of the biscuit for professional service firm pricing. You don’t know what you don’t know about a client’s needs and wants until you sit down face to face. BUT, in our space (PR and marketing), you can educate prospects about your fees in a general way by supplying loose guidelines about the industry in general and the space you work in particular (solo practitioner, small agency, large independent, and so on). That way you won’t be bothered by the uneducated or the cheap, but you may attract some bigger fish that find your broad range enticing.

  • franswaa

    @DannyBrown@Glenn Street …

    This is pretty common for a lot of businesses. I think it comes down to a business deciding to “package” offerings or not. We do a bit of both because some organizations want to “buy the car they see off the lot” and others want something that’s tailored to their needs.

    Both work. It’s just a matter of how a business wants to serve the market they’re in.

    If all you do is tailored work – knock it out of the part every time and word will spread.

    If all you do is package offerings that people can select from – make sure the offerings “fit” in the market you serve. word will spread.

    Answering the question of IF we should offer packages or tailored/custom work (or some combo) is the real question. Once you answer that … do great work and the rest will take care of it self.

  • Ameena Falchetto

    I love this. Especially coming from a retail marketing background where we’d break down prices into 3 segments – publish the one price that we could slash at any point but the real cost was always concealed. It was all about getting the leads in and relying on the heavy sales tactics of the team to close the deal. It’s a business model that works but it’s sleazy, tough and undoubtedly leads to a lot of time wasted. Transparency is the way forward. Thanks for leading the way so clearly Marcus!

  • I’m with you Marcus. First thing I did before I started my production company was check out competition websites. Nobody had prices… drove me nuts. I made including prices on our website a priority.

    –Tony Gnau

  • I’m with you Marcus. First thing I did before I started my production company was check out competition websites. Nobody had prices… drove me nuts. I made including prices on our website a priority.

    –Tony Gnau

  • ginidietrich

    @franswaa I was trying to figure out what “oen” meant. One. LOL

  • Glenn Street

    @DannyBrown Danny, see what you and Marcus did, stirring the hornet’s nest? I have a man crush on you both for that. And have a few girl crushes, too, for your comments. 🙂

    As business owners, we have an obligation to become our own customers. Forget all the nuances and gotcha’s we know. Instead, visualize yourself as a “I know nothing ’bout this stuff” customer and take a razor-eyed look at what you see from that perspective. I understand you have a complex business that has a lot of nuances to account for (like Barb’s), but I fear that approach is most often used as a crutch to justify a comfy-for-me presentation style, rather than seeing your business from your customers eyes.

    You make a choice with how you present yourself, and choose which of two paths to go down: Do you pull, by funneling every person you can your way and sort through all of them to find the gems? Or do you attract, by being upfront about who you want as your customers? Each path has it’s advantages, just don’t try to mix the two.

    Just told Barb that Marcus said she is going to explain her pricing to potential patients on video. Have to go resuscitate her.

  • @Kristi Hines@Marcus_Sheridan Well, Kristi said what I wanted to say, so I think I’ll just expand on it. 🙂 I agree the fear with pricing is that you will be competing on price only and never get that chance to differentiate your product/services. The fear is the potential customers who will see the price and never call. I guess what people are missing is the large number of people who never call because they googled price and never even saw the site.

    It would be great to test which number is bigger — but it’s pretty hard to prove what someone didn’t do!

  • @Glenn Street Haha, girl crushes too? Awesome!

    I completely get where @Marcus_Sheridan is coming from in the piece, and can see why it works for some.

    I guess the way I see the other side is perception. Let’s say I put a price on for a basic service of ours (Facebook Page creation) and price that up at $500.

    That’s only a very minute part of what we do on social – we prefer to build a full cross-platform branding. So, blog/website, supported by other channels where needed.

    However, someone comes to our site because a social media expert said everyone needs a Facebook Page. They see we build that for $500, and order. For the time it tales our designer to create the branding, and the discussions we have re. the look and feel (not to mention the interactive sign-up forms, etc), you’re immediately over the $500 before you even start.

    Now, say that person loves the design, and word of mouth spreads about us being the go-to guys for $500 Facebook pages.

    Now our time is spent answering or diverting questions about the smallest part of our business, which takes us away from where we’d prefer to be.

    That’s why I’m not a proponent of pricing for every single business and industry on the web. 😉

  • RyanSkinner

    Of course, if you include a pricing page on your site (clearly labelled), and you use marketing automation software, you can bump up the score of anyone visiting your pricing pages. Especially, those who come back. That’s going to be a pretty hot prospect….

  • Glenn Street

    @DannyBrown If there’s anything I learned in my years of sales it’s… 1. Tire kickers will fit into the cubbyholes we try to neatly stuff them into. 2. Buyers rarely fit into the cubbyholes we try to messily stuff them into. 3. There’s a significant number of buyers who need to be allowed to make a bad purchase against your best advice, but they will often return after realizing their mistake and remember who tried to help them avoid it. 4. Some of the best referral sources are customers you didn’t sell anything to, or helped them buy elsewhere if doing so was in their best interest.

  • I think these are all valid points. I know when I am looking at various services I look for price and most often I go with the one who has it listed. My reason is this, call me a cynic but I live in L.A. where small shops never have pricing and I feel like I am thrown into a bargaining match over dish soap. I don’t like it, it makes me think that I am about to be taken advantage of regardless of how much it ends up costing.

  • derekgrant

    Great points – It’s hard to imagine that some companies don’t take an open approach to pricing. This is less feasible when the price book is complex and requires add on’s (e.g., enterprise software licenses that require consulting hours, M&S, and per-server licenses), however it’s a must in cloud sales.

  • Glenn Street

    @DannyBrown@Marcus_Sheridan Woman crushes, actually. I apologize to members of the More Cognitive sex for my sloppy use of language.

    Danny, it sounds like you are bumping up against the most common trait of buyers versus the tire kickers. I’m 58 years old and have yet to see a buyer who knows what the price will actually be (and I spent 10 years in an industry where the prices were well known).

    If making the sale is complex and hard, don’t blame it on the customer. You simply haven’t done your job – and I’m telling that to myself as well. People don’t care what technology or products or services they use, as long as what they want to accomplish works for them.

    If you are a professional. your job is to make the complex simple to understand and easy to buy. It’s not to explain why they need x, y and z. Getting into x,y,z conversations means you haven’t listened enough.

    Which is why publishing a public price list (even a ball park one) shouldn’t scare a professional. It’s an opportunity to show you really know your stuff, by demonstrating you KNOW what they are looking for (having done similar jobs a thousand times before) and have the knowledge to make it happen again. This time, for them. But you’ll never gain their trust touting terminology. Make your price list read like a novel, with chapters a client will find and say “Hey, that’s me.”

  • derekgrant

    Great points – It’s hard to imagine that some companies don’t take an open approach to pricing. This is less feasible when the price book is complex and requires add on’s (e.g., enterprise software licenses that require consulting hours, Maintenance and Support, or per-server licenses), however it’s a must in cloud sales.

  • I almost saw Marcus being serious for a second here 🙂 Kidding. This really sounds like a great advice and I am not sure why more people don’t talk about pricing. I know, if I am in search of an info about a service, it is usually because I wanna know the price first.

  • That webinar sounds fun. I’ve put up and taken down pricing information on one of my blogs countless time. Right now it’s down – the reason being that I can’t handle any more growth right now. BUT, I leave prices on products up and subscription forms intact always. I’m thinking about putting the pricing information back up while I form an alternate plan to handle referring any interim sign ups.

  • @Glenn Street@Marcus_Sheridan It’s not a matter of fear, Glenn, trust me – it’s simply a matter of not having prices works for us. If that changes, we’ll look at how we approach things. 🙂

  • MSchechter

    Pricing, pshaw… You should see my backwoods of an industry where people are afraid to post the products, none the less the prices due to fear of “copying”. I try to explain to many of them that the fear of “not getting discovered” is greater, but they won’t budge…

    For us, price has almost always been a positive. Makes people realize our products are far more accessible than they thought. For the few who see the price and are turned off, well that is their time and our time better spent…

  • @DannyBrown@Marcus_Sheridan EXACTLY! I sat there reading your awesome post (to be expected, Marcus) and thinking that applies really well for product based businesses like yours (i.e., pools), but how in the world can I apply it to my service based business where I am also moving away from hourly and going to monthly retainers and where each one is different. It’s tough! I do get where your’e going with this Marcus and I like the idea of qualifying my leads and not wasting anyone’s time, but I’m still struggling with it.

    I like what @ginidietrich suggests re: minimums and that’s what I use now to verbally evaluate/weed out clients that aren’t a fit. I’ll keep working on it and SO appreciate the food for thought. I will def sign up for the webinar next week!!

  • @MSchechter Well said bud. I bet you see some crazy stuff in the jewelry industry. Geez , talk about antiquated of thought, great to see you thinking forward brother. 🙂

  • @Tinu Too busy? Dang girl, go ahead!! (Sounds like you may need to raise them prices of yours!) 😉

  • MSchechter

    @Marcus_Sheridan It’s often good intentions and bad practices. The one positive about the explosion of Social is that it is finally getting them to take the web seriously. The problem, the only part of the web that they are taking seriously is social…

  • @Brankica Yup, that’s the first thing we all look for…..and the last thing anyone wants to talk about. Hmmmm, am I missing something here?

  • @Brankica Yup, that’s the first thing we all look for…..and the last thing anyone wants to talk about. Hmmmm, am I missing something here?

  • @delwilliams Great point. A business I like to refer to as a parallel to what you’re saying is Carmax. They have their ‘low price, haggle-free guarantee’. That way, everyone knows they’re going to get a good deal and not have to play mind games with a guy in a suit to do better. And the last I looked, Carmax was making a little bit of money. 😉

  • @RyanSkinner Now you’re talking my language Ryan. Excellent point.

  • @Ameena Falchetto Hey Ameena, great point. And wouldn’t you say those ‘sales tactics’ are getting really lame by this point because most people with half a brain see them from a mile away? Transparency is the new ‘sales technique’ of the 21st century…..Hmmmm, that has a nice ring to it. 😉

  • @BobReed Good points Bob. For me, I really just come down to a willingness to be a great teacher. That’s what Google likes, and that’s what consumers like. People smell transparency….and to them, it smells dang good.

    Great seeing you bud, hope you’re coming to the next webinar btw….or you can just call me and I’ll give you the 10 minute speed-version. 😉

    Marcus

  • @EricaAllison@DannyBrown@ginidietrich Awesome Erica!! So glad you enjoyed it and I think if you’re willing to at least put something on your site to discuss the issue (which doesn’t mean answer the question btw) you’ll find great results. Can’t wait to see how it goes for you! 🙂

    See you at the webinar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • @Marcus_Sheridan Terrific post! As much as we’ve rocked inbound, and are growing like a weed, this is one area that we haven’t been aggressive enough with.

    “Qualify better and stop wasting your time.” If I had a nickel for every business owner who complains about a total lack of time. Half their time is being tied up on phone calls which always eventually leads to the price question, and that’s where the party ends!

    I realize that we sometimes get a little paranoid as biz owners, that we need to talk with everyone because we are afraid of what we might miss. Looking at it from this perspective, even a few less calls means more time giving great service and quality control. It’s a win, win!

    You rocked it man! thanks, -Adam

  • @adamsok Hey bud, so great to hear from you. Here’s the thing too, and I’ll know you’ll appreciate this– If we’re really doing inbound marketing well, that means we’re going to get more leads than we know how to properly handle, which means that we need to qualify better, which means that we need to discuss pricing on the front end, which means we’ll now close deals quicker, which means we’ll now get paid more, which means we’ll now spend more time with our wife and kids……Ahhh, now that’s the beauty of inbound marketing and transparency. 🙂

  • @T60Productions Great thinking Tony, and I’m sure it has paid some huge dividends.

    Thanks for dropping by!

    Marcus

  • franswaa

    @ginidietrich haha. yea, you got me on that “oen” 🙂

  • I’m a huge fan of pricing on a website, so much so that we’re releasing a print catalog with all of our products, services, and opt-in offers, all with pricing. I’ve been in services businesses for more than 11 years and find that people don’t list prices because:

    1. They don’t want to scare away potential customers

    2. They think their competitors are watching and don’t want to get copied

    3. Because “no one else in our industry does it so why should we”

    All of the above reasons are total crap and led by fear of loss. Companies need to stop trying to be all things to all people and focus on the customers who can and will pay for their products. Doing anything else is a complete waste of time and money.

    +1 for listing prices.

  • krennmedkwu2

    @cloudmarketings http://t.co/iOwFIz2

  • krennmedkwu2

    @cloudmarketings http://t.co/iOwFIz2

  • AlinaKelly

    @TheSalesLion Hello Marcus, It’s been really interesting to hear all these perspectives on pricing. Thanks for opening this conversation.

    I agree that if your product/service can be clearly scoped (i.e. what the client gets can be clearly defined) then you can likely put a price–or range of prices–on it. And I wholeheartedly agree with the benefits of transparency. I really like it as a consumer. Having said that, I also have to agree with @DannyBrown that in some industries, pricing in this fashion is all but impossible. I can’t think of two clients in the last 10 years for whom I’ve done exactly the same thing for which I charged exactly the same amount.

    I’ve taken a very different approach to pricing lately: value. Value to the client (what do I bring that others don’t) and value to me (is this good for me and my business/portfolio). @DannyBrown says it well, “You’re not comparing the price of beans in a supermarket; you’re comparing quality experience and results, and advice that’s right for your company.” While we’re in competition with others, to be certain, I’m not competing so much on price. Every prospective job has a value to me and a value to the client, and every job I price is unique. The right price is where those two values intersect. I don’t know how to come up with a price list that reflects this.

    My two cents (not reflective of my aforementioned pricing policy).

    Alina

  • AlinaKelly

    @TheSalesLion Hello Marcus, It’s been really interesting to hear all these perspectives on pricing. Thanks for opening this conversation.

    I agree that if your product/service can be clearly scoped (i.e. what the client gets can be clearly defined) then you can likely put a price–or range of prices–on it. And I wholeheartedly agree with the benefits of transparency. I really like it as a consumer. Having said that, I also have to agree with @DannyBrown that in some industries, pricing in this fashion is all but impossible. I can’t think of two clients in the last 10 years for whom I’ve done exactly the same thing for which I charged exactly the same amount.

    I’ve taken a very different approach to pricing lately: value. Value to the client (what do I bring that others don’t) and value to me (is this good for me and my business/portfolio). @DannyBrown says it well, “You’re not comparing the price of beans in a supermarket; you’re comparing quality experience and results, and advice that’s right for your company.” While we’re in competition with others, to be certain, I’m not competing so much on price. Every prospective job has a value to me and a value to the client, and every job I price is unique. The right price is where those two values intersect. I don’t know how to come up with a price list that reflects this.

    My two cents (not reflective of my aforementioned pricing policy).

    Alina

  • BobReed

    @Marcus_Sheridan Thanks, Marcus. I’m already signed up! Can’t wait for this one. BTW, I’m working on my questions/headlines for the new blog.

  • @Marcus_Sheridan@adamsok Can I please get an infographic of that? 🙂

  • Glenn Street

    @Marcus_Sheridan@delwilliams Ouch. I was that “guy in a suit” for a few years, but didn’t wear a suit. Too out of place in our part of the world. 🙂

    I will say, though, selling cars is a great way to learn the numerous ways to make a sale. Have long held the notion that a.) Great car salespeople are a better psychologist than psychologists are (except when it comes to heavy duty disorders) and, b.) Most salespeople I have met, who are really quite talented in their niche, wouldn’t last two months working the floor of a car dealership.

    And FWIW, went out of my way to not be “that car salesman”. As a result, was the first salesman at the dealership to win Top Salesman awards despite no longer being a “liner”. Though I had advanced to other positions in the sales department, had enough sales due to referrals to win.

    Ironically, never won Top Salesman while actually being a salesman. Have been a big believer in the power of word of mouth referrals since.

  • So @Marcus_Sheridan you got me back over here (I lurked and ran yesterday). Not too long ago I was on a major national site, investigating what they charge for a service for research.. and was so frustrated that there were no prices, anywhere; that it took a call and a few people to get a range and then hear ‘service plans’ or ‘on site visits’ that before I heard some actual numbers. Grrr.

    That said, I agree with @DannyBrown and @EricaAllison and @sydcon_mktg : it depends. Putting those ranges on there, even answering those ‘expectations’ questions as clearly as possible is a good idea but it’s still apples to oranges to Honda and not always relative or scalable. People still come in loving this Fortune 500 hotel website, and want it for the low end No-tell Motel budget. Here’s another thing, more than time and money, it’s also value.. value delivered by experience and expertise. It may only take a designer 3 hours (after tons of research) to come up with the next ‘swoosh just do it’ logo and tagline, but it will bring value to that company for years to come and that value is amplified by being a global brand, it’s worth more. Don’t misunderstand me.. you are right: we all have to answer the pricing question anyway, I just have to find another way that works for me. FWIW.

  • We have pricing on the How We Help you page at Find New Customers http://www.findnewcustomers.com I figured it was an open, candid thing to do, but it has won rave reviews.

  • Marcus – Great stuff here my friend. Typical Sales Lion type work (great)!

    As a consumer, I always look for pricing. It’s just how we’re built – we want good value. Not saying we want what’s cheapest…but we want the best overall value.

    This being the case, I have different expectations when it comes to products & services that are custom in nature. For non custom things, I need to see pricing. It’s how I associate value and make the decision to see if it’s worth me taking my interest to the next step.

    For services that are more custom in nature – a simple price range would be nice, but I really need to have a communication to explain my custom need, so I can then understand how the pricing will come into play.

    So, I’m with you here…but I do understand when businesses leave off prices for certain products and services.

    With that said…with the right content marketing strategy, one could get all those “custom” questions answered and refer to those articles in the pricing section to give more meat and potatoes!

  • Glenn Street

    @JeffOgden Jeff, could you offer a before/after comparison of the effect your public price list has had, if you have such information? Not specific dollars, of course, but some kind of ROI effect that we can understand and relate to?

    Kind of crazy, though, isn’t it? Doing a “simple” act of combining “how much” with “what value do I get” wins raves… go figure.

  • Completely agree. In one of my roles in a company I’m assisting with digital marketing for is finding 3rd party SEO companies.

    I was amazed at how ALL of them had NO pricing information, 90% didn’t have a direct contact number and many of them did not have a ‘contact us for consultation’ option. just a general enquiries contact email.

    I don’t want an email conversation that will potentially take weeks to get the answers I want, I want to be able to get the answers I need within 5 minutes during a human phone call.

    How many potential clients have these companies lost?

  • Yogizilla

    @DannyBrown I definitely agree with tailoring services and pricing to meet the REAL needs there.. But I think what Marcus is saying is that your site should not just be one long “Call for price!” type of thing. There needs to be something to really entice people, even if all you do is use the verbage “our pricing is industry standard and tailored to your needs”. That’s not great copy but you get the spirit of what I’m trying to convey here!

    That said, I don’t discuss pricing on my web site, only because a majority of my work comes in the form of ghostwriting and sub-contracting, so people name their prices and I say “YAY” or “NAY”. This works for me for now since I’m at a comfortable capacity where I can still deliver quality, reinvest profits, and not burn myself out. ;o)

  • Yogizilla

    @DannyBrown I agree with both of you guys and your approach is not mutually exclusive from transparency. I think Marcus is just saying don’t try to pull the bait-and-switch on customers or act like everything is a “trade secret”. If you want people to “call for more”, there has to be very compelling reasons.

    Now, that said, I believe that static pricing only works in some industries. You can have guidelines that state things like “Starting at BLAH” and then offer things like “Get A Quote” or “Customize”. Certainly, things like time constrictions, human resources, and how complex the project will be can change projects completely.

    For example, web design is one of those places. I’ve had clients that were charged anywhere from $4,000-10,000 for a simple web site that was, for all intents and purposes, a digital brochure. No integration, no user-generated content, no landing pages, no SEO work, no CMS, no continued support.. Nada. Just the site and a “good luck”.

    Pricing is a tricky matter. You have to consider affordability and sustainability, first and foremost. If you can break-down project work into “a la carte” services and then offer clients custom-tailored bundles/packages, then there may be an opportunity there to be more forth-right with how much it will cost them.

    Of course, there’s always the matter of cost versus value.. But I can tell you I rarely do business with folks that don’t list prices. Now here’s where I am a hypocrite: I don’t list my prices… Because it all depends on so many factors. For example, if I am helping a non-profit with a tight budget or someone from my church, they’re usually not going be able to be able to afford the whole shabang.. So I rather touch people personally and negotiate prices that are fair for all parties involved.

    Truth be told, I don’t have my web sites set up for “selling”. They’re strictly for networking, establishing credibility, and strengthening relationships.. Plus the residual income from other stuff doesn’t hurt.

    Like you said, it all depends on your goals and industry. You’re always on point, Danny.. And constantly challenging us.. Punk. ;o)

    <3

  • Yogizilla

    @Kristi Hines@DannyBrown I feel like per-hour or even per-diem rates work well for some things. When you’re campaigning, this can work.. You can do a short campaign for something like “I want to promote my Facebook page and increase my fans by X amount for a week or month.” Then again, that’d be better billed out as on a flat project rate.

    Maybe we’re talking about the quick things that don’t require constant follow-up and maintenance? Say, for example, sending press releases out.

    It all depends on your workflow and capacity too. As Danny said, hourly rates could devalue your work (on both sides of the equation). There’s also the matter of folks that will milk that hourly rate.

    For me, doing a deposit approach works. Quote what the full project will cost, what the scope of work is, and then collect the remaining balance upon completion. You have to make sure you manage expectations properly. If your scope of work is not properly outlined, people will try to squeeze every last bit of work out of you.

    I had that with a client I was developing a web site for years ago. I made it clear that she would have to use the CMS to populate content. Then I gave in and started to generate unique content for her.. It became WAY too involved and not profitable enough for me.. So that did not end well.

    It happens. 8)

  • Yogizilla

    @Marcus_Sheridan@Kristi Hines@DannyBrown Haha.. I just said the same thing elsewhere. Now I feel like I need to get on this. d’oh

    At the very least, breaking down your services to their finer parts helps. I mean, not everyone understands right off the bat what Social Media Strategy, Web Design, Web Development, Inbound Marketing, and all these other buzz words really mean. Features tell, benefits sell.. I suppose that much of the old sales training is still relevant. =o]

  • Yogizilla

    @EugeneFarber@Marcus_Sheridan@adamsok I have some related infographics at http://unbounce.com/seo/the-adaptive-seo-approach/ but I’ll be the first to say I’ve helped clients implement these methods.. But I need to do more of this myself. I’m still in that formulation phase where I am profitable but I’m also near capacity with my hands on so many things.. So I don’t want to go crazy selling.

    For me, all that organic traffic is an opportunity to build relationships for future relationships.. So, when I’m ready to take on more work and all my duckies are in line, I can rock it out.

    I hope that inspires someone out there. You don’t hear enough about us bootstrapping small businesses with large families and tons of crap going on. If I told you guys about all the projects I have in the works, you might think I am crazy.. Which is mostly accurate. LOL

  • Yogizilla

    @RobertDempsey All very good points. I think the main thing I’ve gathered here is that it further qualifies your leads so, when you finally get to interact, you’re getting to the good stuff. Makes sense, really. 8)

  • @Yogizilla I can say for a fact that I’ve saved at least 40 hours of conversations I would have otherwise had to have by being upfront with my pricing. Again, even if someone doesn’t know how much a service might be or have a strict budget, I have found that they always have an amount in their head that they will spend.

  • Yogizilla

    @RobertDempsey _ There you go and, like I said, you’ll get to focus on the folks that are truly interested so no one’s time is wasted. It’s a great way to kill the noise and increase opt-ins. At the very least, everyone should have a page that breaks down what exactly they do and how they deliver on it, in a nutshell. 8)

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  • Tracie Thompson

    Here via @RobertDempsey on Twitter. Interesting reading.

    I’m an artist and there’s so much weirdness about whether to put prices on an art website or not. But you know, when I Google for “animal portrait pricing,” I get a LOT of results, and it seems pretty clear that a lot of people must be looking for the information.

    In addition, I seem to get about a 50/50 split between people who find my prices shockingly high and those who find them surprisingly low. Maybe I’ll get more inquiries from the crowd that assumes I must charge twice as much as I do, if I put the prices out there in the first place. Thanks for giving me a lot to think about.

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  • Gary Hawkins

    On websites using a shopping cart pricing is obviously readily available to your customers. That being said, if you think your pricing differentiates you from your competitors then highlight it on your landing page(s). Since we offer a downloadable video product rather than physical DVDs, we’re able to offer a great product at a fraction of the cost of traditional offerings. We want potential customers to realize this as soon as they get to us.

  • Well, usually if you don’t have clear pricing information about your business or product it simply means that its price do not reflect its quality and its value. It costs too much for what it gives. If someone is clear about advantages and features and the product is correctly priced than there is no need to be scared about saying how much it costs. Imho anyway. 🙂

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  • kcmgmarketing

    Awesome post! So here’s my question…what do you think about having someone enter their email address to get instant access to your pricing? I’m interested to hear some thoughts. Thank you.

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