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Lindsay Bell

Join Rob Biesenbach for a Special Livefyre Q&A Today

By: Lindsay Bell | April 16, 2014 | 
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Rob BiesenbachBy Lindsay Bell

Are you feeling a little…down on yourself today?

Asking yourself, “What have I really done with my life?”

Well, this isn’t going to make you feel any better.

Rob Biesenbach is what you might call a renaissance man.

Not only is he an independent corporate communications pro, he’s a former vice president for Ogilvy PR Worldwide and spent time as the press secretary to the Ohio Attorney General.

But, that’s not all.

He is also a Second City trained actor who has appeared in more than 150 stage, commercial, and film productions in the past decade.

Honestly.

The nerve of this guy!

Ok, all kidding aside (though, really, where does he find the time?), you might be familiar with Rob through the comments here at Spin Sucks, or you might have attended his recent Spin Sucks Pro webinar, Eleven Deadly Presentation Sins: A Path to Redemption for Public Speakers.

And what you really must do now, is run out and pick up a copy of his latest book: 11 Deadly Presentation Sins – A Path to Redemption for Public Speakers, PowerPoint Users, and Anyone Who Has to Get Up and Talk in Front of an Audience.

The book title pretty much sums it up. In PR, few things are more important than the ability to present your ideas in clear and compelling terms.

Solid presentation skills can help everyone in business win! You’ll be more likely to gain approval for projects and budgets, rally teams, motivate employees, and better position yourself as a leader, if you can work a room, and know how to make an impact.

Rob will be here today to answer your questions about how to triumph over everything from a listless delivery to lackluster content, from meandering stories to mundane visuals.

Today’s Livefyre Q&A

At noon ET (that’s 11:00 CT, 10:00 MT, and 9:00 PT for those of you who can’t do time zones), Rob will be here to answer any and all of your questions: What should you do if you freeze in front of an audience? Is it even possible to make presentation slides more compelling? Is there a difference between presenting in a boardroom rather than an auditorium? And, is that really him in that Cialis commercial…?

In order to participate, all you have to do is:

  • Make sure you have a Livefyre account or be ready to sign in with one of your social networks.
  • Set a reminder for noon ET today.
  • Order the book so you can support Rob and get your learn on.
  • Create a list of questions (if you haven’t read the book, you can bribe me and I’ll write some for you!).
  • Come back here, scroll to the bottom, and write a comment in the form of a question. As soon as you hit “post comment,” Rob will see it and reply to you. You can even join the conversation around questions others are asking, if you like.

We’ll be here for an hour so you can join us the entire time or step in and out during the hour. It’s entirely up to you; just make sure you’re here before 12:59.

Win a Copy

Those of you who participate in today’s Livefyre Q&A (even if you’re late to the party, but not if you’re an Arment Dietrich employee) will be entered into a random drawing for a free copy of the book.

Don’t forget – you have to actually leave a comment, ask a question, or participate in the chat to be entered in the drawing. Otherwise we won’t know you were here.

Get ready with your questions and join the conversation. And don’t fear! If you missed the live portion of this, we’ll keep the drawing open until midnight PT so you still have time to get in your questions.

Former Guests and Who’s Next

For former guests, check out Margie ClaymanSarah RobinsonMark StoryBeth HaydenSarah EvansStanford SmithChris BroganC.C. ChapmanMitch JoelDanny BrownChuck HemannMichael BritoDJ WaldowTom MartinAhava LeibtagJay Baer, Shel Israel, Mark Schaefer, and Gini Dietrich.

And following are the dates for the next few months, so mark your calendars!

Same bat time, same bat channel.

About Lindsay Bell


Lindsay Bell is the content director at Arment Dietrich, and works in Toronto. A former TV producer, she’s a strong advocate of three minutes or less of video content. She has a cool kid, a patient husband, two annoying cats, and Hank Dawge, a Vizsla/Foxhound/moose hybrid. Ok, maybe not moose.

198 comments
TheEdible
TheEdible

Could have deffinitly used this in college...

spinchick
spinchick

I am going to pick up a copy of his book. It sounds interesting. I am getting more and more requests to speak. I did a presentation last week and did fine until....I got a little tired and unfocused, and forgot some of my key points. Thanks for the tip, Lindsay.

Latest blog post: Brett Hoebel ab

belllindsay
belllindsay

Well, HUGE thanks to @RobBiesenbach for being with us here today for this. Very interesting! And thanks to everyone else who joined in with questions, and comments - even @Howie Goldfarb!! 

belllindsay
belllindsay

@RobBiesenbach I'm bumping @Eleanor Pierce's comment back to the top in case you missed it: In the book you talk about body language myths - what's the biggest misconception you think people have about body language?

belllindsay
belllindsay

Worst presentation you’ve ever seen. You don’t have to name names. Unless you want to...


Eleanor Pierce
Eleanor Pierce

In the book you talk about body language myths - what's the biggest misconception you think people have about body language?

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

One of the things your book sets out to do is, "Tap into emotion to win hearts and change minds."


How does one do that?

belllindsay
belllindsay

Ok, back to Second City.... How does improv study help you when you give a presentation? 

RobBiesenbach
RobBiesenbach

@belllindsay  It was a meeting of PR people and the speaker was a self-described marketing expert. He made every mistake in the book. In fact, that incident helped give me the idea for the book.

He was totally old school: lecture instead of interaction, hard sell of his product, ugly slides -- one of them had 140 words! I talked about him in my last guest post, I believe.

Heather MacGregor
Heather MacGregor

@belllindsay  Ugh. Bosses are SUCH a nuisance. I had to disconnect there. Will this chat be available somewhere later?


Worst presentation I ever saw was a guy reading a speech at the podium. 

RobBiesenbach
RobBiesenbach

@Howie Goldfarb  I saw a speaker a couple of weeks who barely moved from one spot in a four-hour workshop. And he was mesmerizing. So you never know. If you're really, really good, you can command the room staying still.

But most people want to move, which is good -- but again, make sure it's for a purpose. Don't wander. Cross the stage when changing the subject. Approach the audience when making a really important point.

RobBiesenbach
RobBiesenbach

@ginidietrich  Find out what resonates with your audience, going back to the 6 questions under Howie's question. The better you know them the better you'll know the emotional triggers that work with them.

Of course, some things are universal: love, loss, disappointment, family, etc.

They key is to be in touch with your own emotions, because if it's contrived or looks fake, it will fall flat.


ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@Howie Goldfarb  I once attended a presentation at a conference for PR firm owners. The keynote had NO idea who was in the audience and spoke to us like we were working for a large healthcare company. It was super disappointing.

JoeCardillo
JoeCardillo

@RobBiesenbach  Sorry I missed ya Rob! But excited to look through Q&A, not even a doubt in the world I'll learn something useful. 

Heather MacGregor
Heather MacGregor

@belllindsay  And btw, I saw one of the authors of Freakanomics give a talk (forget his name now..). So monotone, almost boring, but the information was really gripping and it totally worked. 


Thanks!

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

@belllindsay @Howie Goldfarb  Absolutely not. That's inexcusable. You should always know who is in the audience, even if it's just demographics. In this situation, the keynote speaker also was a PR firm owner. Imagine the kind of value he could have brought had he realized he was speaking to his peers.