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Gini Dietrich

Join Stanford Smith for a Special Livefyre Q&A Today

By: Gini Dietrich | February 20, 2013 | 
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Guess what today is?!

It’s the third Wednesday of the month, which means…Livefyre Q&A day!

Today we have Stanford Smith, of Pushing Social fame (and someone I got to meet in real life at Social Slam last year), on to talk about Born to Blog, the new book he co-authored with Mark Schaefer (Businesses Grow, The Tao of Twitter, Return on Influence).

While the book isn’t out until April, you can pre-order it and, if you send your receipt to Stanford, he has goodies and freebies and a unicorn he’ll send you.

Today’s Chat

At noon ET (that’s 11:00 CT, 10:00 MT, and 9:00 PT for those of you who can’t do time zones), Stanford is going to be hanging out in the comments so you can ask him anything and everything about the book, what it’s like to work with Mark, how he makes a business helping others succeed at blogging, or his best writing tips.

In order to participate, all you have to do is:

  • Make sure you have a Livefyre account or be ready to sign in with one of your social networks.
  • Set a reminder for noon ET today.
  • Pre-order the book so you can get a unicorn (and free cupcakes!).
  • Create a list of questions.
  • Come back here, scroll to the bottom, and write a comment in the form of a question. As soon as you hit “post comment,” Stanford will see it and reply to you. You can even join the conversation around questions others are asking, if you like.

We’ll be here for an hour so you can join us the entire time or step in and out during the hour. It’s entirely up to you; just make sure you’re here before 12:59.

Win a Copy

Those of you who participate in today’s chat (even if you’re late to the party, but not if you’re an Arment Dietrich employee) will be entered in a random drawing for a free copy of the book.

We bought two copies and will give them both away, but you have to participate to be entered in the drawing. Otherwise we won’t know you were here. And you have to wait until April ti receive it because it’s not out before then.

Get ready with your questions and join the conversation. And don’t fear! If you missed the live portion of this, we’ll keep the drawing open until midnight PT so you still have time to get in your questions.

Former Guests and Who’s Next

For former guests, check out Margie ClaymanSarah RobinsonMark StoryBeth Hayden, and Sarah Evans.

And following is the lineup through September so mark your calendars! Same bat time, same bat channel.

If you have recommendations on who to fill the open slots, let me know! Our only requirement is they have published a book and it centers around PR, marketing, social media, or entrepreneurship.

See you today at noon!

About Gini Dietrich


Gini Dietrich is the founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich, a Chicago-based integrated marketing communications firm. She is the lead blogger here at Spin Sucks and is the founder of Spin Sucks Pro. She is the co-author of Marketing in the Round and co-host of Inside PR. Her second book, Spin Sucks, is available now.

247 comments
ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

Well boys and girls (and the crazies), the hour has come and gone very, very quickly. If you're just arriving here and missed the "live" portion of the Q&A, go ahead and leave your question and @Stanford will come back by and answer it. 

 

Thank you so much for joining us...and a HUGE congrats to @Stanford and @markwschaefer on their new book!

stevenmcoyle
stevenmcoyle

Like other marketing tools, sometimes blogging isn't for every company. What are some signs that a company should abandon blogging and put their content efforts else where?

jasonkonopinski
jasonkonopinski

If you were to look at the blogosphere as a whole, what trends are you seeing? Are posts becoming less about providing value and more about punditry, or are readers regardless of niche seeking tactical, actionable stuff vs. op-ed? 

 

It's a constant struggle for me to balance higher-level theoretical pieces with the practical. 

Latest blog post: Poetry Friday: Gregory Corso

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

What's the number one reason businesses should blog?

belllindsay
belllindsay

 @Stanford Blogging takes a lot of work, and sometimes you pour your heart and soul into a piece and get crickets.  What do you hate about blogging? There has to be something. 

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

In chapter five you say you introduce five traits all humans share that can be used to craft a compelling blog. Will you give us a peek into just one of those traits?

jasonkonopinski
jasonkonopinski

Do you assign relative weight or importance on specific pieces of content? i.e a blog post vs. a newsletter vs. a podcast vs. video.  

 

What's the ultimate conversion mechanism? 

Latest blog post: Poetry Friday: Gregory Corso

belllindsay
belllindsay

 @Stanford  What is more important, in your opinion, quality or quantity (my vote is quality)? Asking this because we seem to be slipping in quality lately (by we I mean the blogging community) - grammatical/spelling errors, poorly written/researched pieces, etc..

 

Stanford
Stanford

 @jasonkonopinski I have to remind myself that I'm inside the bubble.  I am constantly looking and analyzing this space.  So I have a lower tolerance for "punditry".  But my clients and readers love the content they get in the space.  They value it a great deal. 

 

I don't think we can get away from offering actionable content.  Our job is to find ways to make the theoretical actionable.

Stanford
Stanford

 @jasonkonopinski Great question Jason.  Nice to see you here bro.  I don't assign any importance to different types of content from the outset.  I create the content and see how my readers respond.  My readers value audio as a medium so podcasting is growing in importance.  A smaller segment of my audience loves video but they convert well.  I adjust my activities accordingly.

Stanford
Stanford

 @belllindsay Depends on what falls under quality.  I believe that good quality ideas and content is important.  I have spelling and grammatical errors, but my content quality is good.  You have to make that call for yourself and your audience.  I would get eaten alive if  I was writing for an English Literature audience.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

 @Stanford  @jasonkonopinski Based on our experience, we've done free webinars with pundits and free ones with "how-tos." Guess which one has more registrations (to the tune of three times more)?

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

 @Stanford And how do they do that (for people who just cannot figure it out) without sounding self-serving?

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

 @Stanford So let's take dreaming then...how can that help create blog posts?

belllindsay
belllindsay

 @Stanford No, of course you're not - and I see what you're saying (and you're not the first person who has said the same!) - I'm not a grammar snob or anything, trust me. It's just a bugaboo of mine I guess. 

belllindsay
belllindsay

 @Stanford I would love to have this discussion (argument? LOL) with you over drinks. I humbly disagree and feel that lots of errors devalues the content - no matter how good it is. 

Stanford
Stanford

 @ginidietrich Dreamers envision a better world/situation/solution and advocate for that.  A great example of that is the Kony 2012 campaign to bring attention to an african warlord who kidnaps children for his army. 

 

So blog shaped by a dreamer would focus on solutions, celebrate people who contribute to that solution, and layout a distinct vision of how to get there.

 

 

belllindsay
belllindsay

 @EdenSpodek  @ginidietrich  @jasonkonopinski  @Stanford  @ElissaFreeman Yes, one can edit the heart and soul out of a piece if they lean that way. I inject a lot of personality into my writing. It's just "how I write" - some organizations wouldn't like that. Perhaps your young storyteller should be told up front about the errors, and simply take a course or something. Or if he's got the chops, a good editor is all he'll need. 

EdenSpodek
EdenSpodek

 @ginidietrich  @jasonkonopinski  @Stanford  @belllindsay  Recently, @ElissaFreeman and I had a conversation about a wonderful young storyteller. He's looking to make a career change built on his blogging experience but his writing is full of errors. I hear you but i'm the worst for typos and find even my *editors* don't always catch everything. At the other end of the spectrum, I have a client who edits to the extreme where her voice is getting lost and we keep pushing back before she hits "publish". 

DwayneAlicie
DwayneAlicie

 @jasonkonopinski  @Stanford  @belllindsay @ginidietrich Some people freak out over errors -- and of course some don't. I think it's important to avoid alienating those who do care about grammar and punctuation. That's my argument for spending time and energy on making things as *standard* as possible. 

 

(Personally, I freak out. Even though I sometimes make mistakes myself, obvi. As I tweeted Lindsay once, commas are my kryptonite. Ugh.)

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

 @EdenSpodek  @jasonkonopinski  @Stanford  @belllindsay For the client I mention, we surveyed their readers, their clients (current and former), some of their prospects, and their peers. It was, hands down, the worst criticism we heard. From non-marketing/communications folks.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich moderator

 @belllindsay  @Stanford I'm personally working with a client right now on their content strategy. The biggest complaint they hear from readers? Their content is inconsistent in how they initial cap (or don't) headlines and the spelling and grammatical errors make them seem less professional than they are. 

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  4. […] guests, check out Margie Clayman, Sarah Robinson, Mark Story, Beth Hayden, Sarah Evans, Stanford Smith, Chris Brogan, C.C. Chapman, Mitch Joel,Danny Brown, Chuck Hemann, Michael Brito, DJ […]