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Gini Dietrich

You Can Be the Next YouTube Star

By: Gini Dietrich | July 2, 2012 | 
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Last night, Joe Jaffe, Alan Wolk, Bob Knorpp, and I recorded episode 207 of BeanCast, in which we discussed whether or not size matters.

No, no. Not that kind of size. The online kind of size. You know…the comments, viewers, followers, fans, community kind.

We talked about Facebook and mobile payments and the right time of day and week to update your social networks. But the portion of the podcast I found most enlightening was when we talked about fame from YouTube.

YouTube Partnerships

A few weeks ago, YouTube launched its partnership program, which is meant to help video creators either amplify their work or create a YouTube-based career.

When it was launched, people were optimistic, but cautiously so. It seemed like a good idea, but no one knew who it would benefit: YouTube or the “star.”

But the numbers are coming in now and it seems like both are benefiting.

We began this conversation around whether or not the act of helping partners create better channels helps advertisers feel more confident about spending money. We discussed whether or not the quality of the content has improved that much or is it just because it’s better aggregated. We even looked at whether or not the marketplace for connecting talent with brands is important.

I was asked the partnership question first, and my perception is – just like on Facebook – we are not the customer. We are the service and YouTube needs us to create more videos so they can sell against it. It makes sense to me the more content they have, the more they can make on advertising.

Nextflix and Hulu

But what I didn’t see coming was Netflix and Hulu.

Alan Wolk works for Kit Digital, a company that is working to move video from television to phones and tablets. It’s enabling social TV. And it’s helping traditional broadcasts find their way to multiple screens.

So I’d venture to say he knows what he’s talking about when it comes to video.

And he said all of the reasons listed above that YouTube is doing this are correct and because Netflix and Hulu have figured out the streaming game and Google wants in on it.

But YouTube has something neither Netflix or Hulu have (who seem to be placating the old guard). They have young, new stars with built-in communities, fans, and followers. They have millions of views and they’re famous in their own rights.

They are becoming the new Hollywood, the new country, the new TV.

These young stars are interviewing metal musicians and making $4,000 a month. Corporations are paying six figures to get some of them in commercials because of their YouTube fame.

Books, Music, Video

This is what is happening in the publishing world…and in music, too. Publishers are working on books with bloggers who have already established a community and already write consistently. They know this is the direct method to sales; not the old way of doing things.

And in music we had Napster that disrupted the industry entirely and paved the way for Spotify and Pandora. But both of those services are still placating the old guard, which means  they’re not doing as well as YouTube.

It’s an interesting world we live in…and it’s about to get even more interesting. These industries won’t die, but we’ll see a ton more evolution out of them before they settle.

Perhaps even one of you will become the next YouTube star. It’s certainly within your reach!

About Gini Dietrich


Gini Dietrich is the founder and CEO of Arment Dietrich, an integrated marketing communications firm. She is the author of Spin Sucks, co-author of Marketing in the Round, and co-host of Inside PR. She also is the lead blogger at Spin Sucks and is the founder of Spin Sucks Pro.

87 comments
philipshaun
philipshaun

I'm impressed, I must say. Very rarely do I come across a blog that's both informative and entertaining, and let me tell you, you've hit the nail on the head. Your blog is important; the issue is something that not enough people are talking intelligently about.

http://www.sandiegofitnessclub.com

awolk1
awolk1

Thank you so much for the mention and for an insightful piece. I have not waded through all 85 comments yet, but most definitely will and then offer some sort of response. It was a great show - Bob is the perfect host.

Tinu
Tinu

Even if YouTube doesn't continue to make "stars" per se, it'll be great if it continues to contribute to content creators earning livable incomes from their work.

ginidietrich
ginidietrich

@TedWeismann What's you learn in the comments, other than @seanmcginnis finally talked me into doing a video show?

annedreshfield
annedreshfield

I follow a lot of makeup beauty bloggers on YouTube, and I'm constantly amazed by the things they buy, either for themselves or for their reviews -- that stuff is EXPENSIVE! I have to constantly remind myself that they're making serious money from their partnership with YouTube. For a lot of them, it's their day job. That's impressive. 

John Fitzgerald
John Fitzgerald

I love the fact that YouTube is developing and curating content from amateurs. I just hope it doesn't result in too many "clip shows." 

Sean McGinnis
Sean McGinnis

I'm going to take this opportunity to IMPLORE you to become a Youtube star with me Gini! ;)

 

We've talked and talked about doing videos together. I think if would be fun and hilarious. You should totally give up the whole "novel" thing (books are so last century) and come on TV with me! He said, she said about Digital Marketing. :)

T60Productions
T60Productions

Hmmmm... what if I don't want to be a YouTube star?  What if I rather have T60 become the Universal Television (i.e. major TV production company) of YouTube?

 

A question for further discussion.

 

--Tony Gnau

CharterJohnM
CharterJohnM

@JustInTheSouth @charter please follow me and DM the security code or PIN. Thanks again for your business.

CharterJohnM
CharterJohnM

@JustInTheSouth @charter We appreciate your interest in our services and would be glad to go over any options you are interested in. If so,

Howie Goldfarb
Howie Goldfarb

You Tube is obviously almost anarchy with the content there. As @dannybrown told us they had to pull some ads that were shown next to homophobic videos. It is more like Twitter where you have the good the bad and the ugly. But it is democratic. You can be a star. Not easy but you can. And brands will find you. I love Epic Meal Time. Those guys created an amazing over the to cooking show with You Tube. In the past you could never have a platform. Now you do.

 

-censored by site monitor size matters comment-

 

Good move by You Tube working with the stars to improve their channels. They have the eyeballs but they need to keep the eyeballs and we all know how fast we move on to the next thing.

 

-censored by site monitor size matters comment-

 

One thing You Tube has done better than anyone is whenever there is imbedded video of any sort that is not a video media company (like NBC or ESPN) it is always hosted on Youtube.

ryancox
ryancox

There are a lot of great conversations in the comments on this post. )cc: @ginidietrich @SociallyGenius @KenMueller @Sean McGinnis )

 

I piggy back off of what was partially a @ginidietrich comment: consumption patterns are evolving specifically to a what I want when I want it. The more and more change to the competitive landscape there is, the easier it is for me to get my content from somewhere else. While I don't think anyone (reads: Apple TV, Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, etc.) has it figured out yet -- we're getting to it. A system where I pay a small monthly fee (comparable to cable costs) and literally get content when I want it and how I want it. 

 

Distribution models are drastically being flipped upside down and user created content is beating out just about everything other than sports and the 'mass appeal' shows. And if you are a show that is run on one of those channels you don't know you have because you only randomly land on it when surfing -- why wouldn't you want to jump the cable ship? There are now ways that you can market your shows and content in more direct ways to people and find news ways for them to consume (read: watch) your show!

 

Re: YouTube star @ginidietrich  -- it's something I've been very 'hip' to since last year working specifically for a client (Revision3) and growing their YouTube community and views. The entire Revision3 content platform was built on being an 'Internet TV' of sorts. They had in-house shows and external shows (they had contracts with to be on Rev3) that created a tech tv platform. As we all know Discovery recently bought them out and all signs have pointed to Discovery taking a run at the 'Internet TV' digital shift we're mentioning. I was shocked to see the amount of dedication shows like Tekzilla, Epic Meal Time, Destructoid, etc. received from fans. If you strip away the previously mentioned Sports and 1% Mass Appeal shows -- the rest of the television "package" goes untouched. 

 

The only horse cable has left in this race are both of those -- and their two thoroughbreds are starting to leak more and more to easier content distribution. First it was written content (blogs, newspapers, books) that was disrupted. Then it was music. Now it's video (tv, movies, shows).

 

The community aspect of it all is huge @ginidietrich and I'm glad you made mention of that. The old guard had a "we control the distribution method so we can control the fans" model. The new guard has a "we give you multiple distribution methods so you can create communities" model. We all are passionate about random shows (Duck Dynasty, Secret Millionnaire), web shows (JennaMarbles, My Drunk Kitchen) and 'Cable shows' (Desperate Housewives, True Blood) <----and no two consumers are the same. All of these shows have massively active and committed fan bases too. Think of Twitter for example, when a new episode of something is released or airing -- the noise created from people talking before, DURING and after creates new viewers everyday.

 

Communities and how shows engage with them will be the new "distribution model" of the next 20 years. How you treat the people that are watching your show is how successful you'll be. Shelf-life for shows isn't what it was 20 years ago -- there are no 'Seinfeld' rights -- you aren't getting 30 year syndication anymore. You've got a 5-10 year window if you're lucky and you need to maximize everything you can in that window.

 

Digital consumption of video is getting meme'd. Our attention spans are getting smaller and smaller unless it is just really flippin' engaging and entertaining content. Asking us to fan your FB page and follow you on Twitter isn't enough anymore. This isn't 2010.

Byron Fernandez
Byron Fernandez

@ginidietrich et al: Netflix is cool but I'm not as prolific a user yet, at least compared to YouTube, hulu and Apple apps. VEVO is also delightful.

TonyBennett
TonyBennett

iJustine is hot, oops, did I just type that out loud. But yeah, youtube has its fair share of celebrities and a lot of kids these days would much rather watch the computer than the TV.. Just saying

KenMueller
KenMueller

All of this really makes me wonder where the networks, and even cable/satellite will be in five years. The pricing on television is outrageous, and the packages are so restrictive. We just tried to move from cable to satellite, and DirectTV made us jump through hoops and had so many caveats that we never made the switch.

 

I love Netflix, and Hulu, and even YouTube, and if they do it right, they can really do some damage. 

bdorman264
bdorman264

So, you want to be a rock star, live large and drive a big car? Get YouTube then, huh? It has to be as easy and free as the rest of this stuff, right?

 

You are right, very interesting and it still has a long way to go, so hold onto your hats because it's going to be a wild ride indeed. 

jasonkonopinski
jasonkonopinski

I'm listening the episode right now!  

 

I'm reminded of something that Tom Webster said to me during BlogWorld when we were discussing the state of podcasting as a medium.  Edison's research shows that more people are consuming podcasts now than ever before, nearly doubling since last year's iteration of the report - but this also means that it is an incredibly competitive space (video, as well) so you have to really Do The Work(tm) to understand audience segmentation, promotion and syndication platforms (podcasts now show up in Hulu!) and production techniques to build up an audience that will choose your show & content over the next guy's. 

 

 

Trackbacks

  1. […] Interestingly it ties into a great conversation that began over on Spin Sucks yesterday about YouTube and other video channels, and the future of programming. I think the next five years will be incredibly interesting as old distribution models fall away […]

  2. […] Interestingly it ties into a great conversation that began over on Spin Sucks yesterdayabout YouTube and other video channels, and the future of programming. I think the next five years will be incredibly interesting as old distribution models fall away […]

  3. […] post on YouTube partnerships caught my eye, and it highlights how YouTube is disrupting the TV and movie industry in the same […]