Jack Elever

Here’s Why Strong Brand Values Are an Organization’s Code

By: Jack Elever | January 24, 2018 | 
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brand valuesHaving unique and well-documented brand values is more common in today’s business world.

More brands are researching and understanding ‘why’ they exist, before placing their values at the forefront of business strategies and goals.

They are even doing this ahead of driving bottom line revenue and increasing average order value.

The New Generation and Staying True to Brand Values

Traditionally, brand values tend to be a list of traits that encompass the company mission.

But the game has changed.

Thanks to digital technology, entrepreneurial spirit, and passion for making the world a better place, new companies are using their mission statement to hammer home brand values.

And they are finding creative ways to adhere to their values, internally and externally.

Purpose drives people, and as a result, a new generation of businesses lets brand values and ethics organically flow from their character and overall mission.

One of those organizations, 4Ocean, dedicates itself to helping stop the pollution of the world’s oceans.

You will see the mission of 4Ocean is clear as soon as you land on the first page of their website.

Their brand values reflect who they are.

They describe themselves as a “global movement actively removing trash from the ocean while inspiring individuals to work together for cleaner oceans, one pound at a time.”

Going Beyond the “Usual” Brand Values

While it isn’t necessary for every brand to create an in-depth code to live by or innovative and challenging reasons why they exist, many brands fall into the category of having “integrity” values.

These brands believe staying true to their word, providing great customer experiences, and using fluid marketing campaigns communicating these values is what sets them apart from the competition.

The problem is we no longer consider these things to be brand values or ethics.

They are now “normal” procedure carried out just to exist in the modern business world.

A brand must provide fast, thorough customer service.

Brands must provide a unique, tailored customer experience.

Brands need to employ innovative marketing campaigns using a style and tone of voice which communicates clearly to their audience.

Fitting within the norm isn’t what sets you apart from the competition anymore!

The Very Best Brands Lead by Example

Brand values may seem a “wishy-washy” term to some.

But history proves that companies who enter the market in their infancy, with a solid mission and plan, can go on to dominate the market.

A prime example of this is Apple.

From the beginning, their mission was to challenge the status quo, making computers not just for business, but for personal use, too.

Their origins stem from the anti-patriarchy, non-conformist views adopted by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak the moment they entered their first rally.

Apple has always innovated and challenged us to think differently about life and about computers.

A good example of their brand values resides within their advertising campaigns.

The very first campaign is the epitome of what Apple and its consumers stand for.

This 1984 Super Bowl ad references the George Orwell book, Nineteen Eighty-Four.

The “status quo” is challenged by the smashing of the screen, which portrays a conformist culture.

From the moment “think differently” appears on screen, this ad and subsequent campaigns released by Apple have, in some way or another, challenged us to think differently.

Modern Businesses Must Learn from the Value in Brand Values

Nothing is set in stone, and we learn from experience.

There is a fine line between understanding your customers, your team, and how your brand values and ethics align.

This is where most of the new generation of businesses have learned the value of brand values and ethics.

Many new brands understand their “why,” staying true to their mission or purpose, and reflecting this within their internal teams, their external marketing collateral, the products or services they provide, and the style in which they communicate to everyone who comes into contact with their brand.

A fine example of this is online gaming brand, PlayOJO.

You need only look at their blog to see the ‘no-nonsense’ style tone of voice they have adopted.

This tone even extends to their external marketing, which features Hollywood actor Geoffrey Bell, known for his brash, no-nonsense manner.

The PlayOJO tone is reflective of its attitude towards industry traditions and heritage.

Similar to Apple, PlayaOJO challenges the status quo of industry standards with ethics in mind.

Gone are the archaic ‘wagering requirements’ and high-deposit bonuses.

Their mission is to provide a fairer and truer online experience.

The PlayOJO Manifesto outlines the drive to provide a transparent, ‘fair and square’ experience for its customers.

There are no hidden-agendas like those you might find at the competition!

Furthermore, this approach to the market, brand style, and tone of voice is reflected in the language used on their site.

Some might say swearing has no place on websites.

However, to reinforce values and brand tone, PlayOJO uses the phrase ‘no-bullshit’ in their marketing collateral.

By communicating honestly, this positions the brand as friendly to its customer base.

Consumers do not view them as just another company trying to take their money.

Strong Brand Values Are an Organization’s Code

To truly resonate more with audiences, more brands should heed the examples set by Apple, 4Ocean, and PlayOJO.

By doing this, they can grow a strong and successful brand with a true and clear mission and reflective values.

Having strong brand values and ethics will give your team a code to work with, and give your customers something they can believe in.

These are goals we should continually strive for, both in business and personally.

About Jack Elever


Jack Elever is a millennial with over five years experience writing content for online brands and he creates SEO-driven, user-centric writing. His work has been featured in The London Economic.

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